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Blonde coed thumb athlete. Kiss background. Big boob amatuer blowjob. Babes soaking their panties porn gifs. Free long mpegs latinas naked. Nude vidya balan lesbians girls xxx sexy pictures. Forced porn stream. Bouncing Black Ass Porn. New york straight men dean deer hunter. To preserve these articles click at this page they originally appeared, The Times does not alter, edit or update them. Occasionally the digitization process introduces transcription errors or other problems. When Parmjit Singh left his job as a mechanic on a Greek Why do indians own gas stations inhe settled in New York City, instead of returning to the family farm in India. After working three years as a busboy Why do indians own gas stations cook in a Greek restaurant, Mr. Singh met a fellow Punjabi who owned a gas station in the city. ByMr. Singh, with an Indian partner, owned 13 gas stations in the New York area. He has competitors, however -- chiefly, other Punjabi Sikhs who began buying and working in gas stations in the city at the same time he did, some of whom now own as many as Growing Economic Force. Indian ownership of gas stations reflects the enormous ethnic transformation of the city during Why do indians own gas stations last decade. With one million newcomers, the latest wave of immigration is the second largest in New York City history. Just a decade ago, gas station ownership usually mirrored the ethnic makeup of the surrounding neighborhood. But now, about 40 percent of the city's stations are run Why do indians own gas stations owned by South Asians, estimated Linda Sachs, a spokeswoman for the the city's Department of Consumer Affairs. This turnover in gas station ownership is one of the many images of a changing New York. While the new immigrants come from a vast spectrum of countries, with a heavy emphasis on Asian, South American and Caribbean nations, and work in a variety of jobs, they have also developed their own specialized niches, virtually monopolizing certain businesses or professions and slowly changing the commercial, political and cultural profile of the city. The forces that draw immigrant groups to certain occupations and businesses -- Indians to gas stations, Koreans and Dominicans to grocery stores and Afghans to click chicken places -- are complex and varied. Their occupational choices are based on factors like skills and values learned in the old country, the paths followed by fellow immigrants who preceded them, or merely a lack of more attractive economic options. Which signs are compatible with capricorn Ambon milf.

Www live Why do indians own gas stations coresex teenage fucking. They don't want anyone to have social power over them. When an individual loans you read article, even worse, gifts you money—you're giving them a ton of face in exchange. Americans find that idea horrifying. It's like signing up for indentured servitude, except—since it's a social rather than legal obligation—you can't even get out of it by declaring bankruptcy!

Bank loans and VC investments are better precisely because they're legal rather than social obligations, so you can get out of click the following article or, say, sell them off to someone else along with the business. And Kickstarter is better because no single individual is responsible for enough of the loan to actually attain much social-obligatory power over you in exchange.

You're maybe beholden to your Kickstarter backers as a classbut you aren't scared to talk to any individual one of them for thought of what they might ask of you.

More to the point, you can never get out of the debt you incur, no matter what you do for the rest of your life. It's not just about the debt one incurs, it's about the one providing the debt and what they expect, lifelong admiration, respect, and deference. I've had insane requests and expectations demanded by family members for really small "gifts" before.

Because of that I'd say that the social interest costs are too high for many Americans to be able to accept anything. Izkata 7 months ago. Maybe not that extreme, but yeah, it's too easy to get guilted into something because you've become socially indebted by something large.

It's not even about being able to get out of it, like you mention afterwards with a legal exchange, it's about the exchange Why do indians own gas stations forced to continue out Why do indians own gas stations a mixture of guilt, politeness, and social pressure in general, simply because you don't want to accidentally kill the personal relationship. It's not just practicing individualism, but insisting Why do indians own gas stations it.

People don't help others partly because they tell themselves that the person needs to make their own way. It is ultimately a justification for selfishness, but the justification is individualism. And I suspect many people who would otherwise not be too proud to ask for help still won't because they perceive that this is a prominent idea in American culture.

I think that goes back to the same point. If Why do indians own gas stations asked my rich uncle for a loan, he and many other people would perceive this as dependency and therefore vaguely shameful.

Brzzera Porn Watch Video Fihingkasubra Xxxwww. Occasionally the digitization process introduces transcription errors or other problems. When Parmjit Singh left his job as a mechanic on a Greek ship in , he settled in New York City, instead of returning to the family farm in India. After working three years as a busboy and cook in a Greek restaurant, Mr. Singh met a fellow Punjabi who owned a gas station in the city. By , Mr. Singh, with an Indian partner, owned 13 gas stations in the New York area. He has competitors, however -- chiefly, other Punjabi Sikhs who began buying and working in gas stations in the city at the same time he did, some of whom now own as many as Growing Economic Force. Indian ownership of gas stations reflects the enormous ethnic transformation of the city during the last decade. With one million newcomers, the latest wave of immigration is the second largest in New York City history. Just a decade ago, gas station ownership usually mirrored the ethnic makeup of the surrounding neighborhood. But now, about 40 percent of the city's stations are run or owned by South Asians, estimated Linda Sachs, a spokeswoman for the the city's Department of Consumer Affairs. This turnover in gas station ownership is one of the many images of a changing New York. While the new immigrants come from a vast spectrum of countries, with a heavy emphasis on Asian, South American and Caribbean nations, and work in a variety of jobs, they have also developed their own specialized niches, virtually monopolizing certain businesses or professions and slowly changing the commercial, political and cultural profile of the city. The forces that draw immigrant groups to certain occupations and businesses -- Indians to gas stations, Koreans and Dominicans to grocery stores and Afghans to fried chicken places -- are complex and varied. Their occupational choices are based on factors like skills and values learned in the old country, the paths followed by fellow immigrants who preceded them, or merely a lack of more attractive economic options. Sociologists agree that there is no universal pattern to these ethnic niches and that often labor specialization is random and hinges on availability of positions in certain localities. Indians, for example, may be preeminent in gas stations in New York, but in Los Angeles those business are dominated by a Korean quasi-monopoly. But once a niche is found, it creates a snowball effect, gathering in labor from that ethnic group and expanding exponentially. The common thread linking all immigrant work niches is the insider's edge on the profession. Ethnic labor, in particular family labor, is cheap and easily exploited and there is no linguistic, cultural or discriminatory barrier. Many immigrants are self-employed entrepreneurs. More than 85 percent of the 1, green grocer stores in the metropolitan area are owned and run by Koreans, sociologists say. The more than , Koreans who have come to New York also own novelty shops, beauty salons, liquor stores and dry cleaning. Indians and Pakistanis -- close to 95, of whom reside in the city -- have a virtual monopoly on newsstands. Since the mid's, they have been buying into gas stations, and their growing presence in the jewelry trade has made them the second largest ethnic group -- after Hasidic Jews -- in the Diamond District. Guyanese -- the fourth largest immigrant group -- can be found throughout the city's pharmacies and machinery repair shops. They also stand out, along with the Jamaicans and Irish, in the child-care business. Even the smallest of immigrant groups, like the Afghans and the Senegalese, have carved out their own niches. There are fewer than 4, Afghans in the city -- almost all war refugees -- yet they own more than fast-food chicken restaurants, Afghan businessmen say, in particular a non-franchised chain of more than 40 called Kennedy's Fried Chicken. The Senegalese, many of them already traders by profession, came to the United States via Europe and have prospered hawking a variety of wares on street corners throughout the city. They all got family or close friends in the business so it just kinda spreads. Gas stations can be lucrative. I've found it's actually been happening less and less, at least where I'm at. Most corporate gas stations your Shells, Gulfs, Mobils, etc can afford to price their gas at lower prices due to the sheer volume they sell. I know family friends I'm middle eastern that had to get out of the business because they couldn't stay competitive with their pricing, so nobody would go there. If this is the case everywhere, hope to see it end quick. Indians' potential Ceiling - Doctors, cardiologists, hospitalists, etc Bottom-feeding - running gas stations Say what you want, they eating good no matter where they're at. All times are GMT The time now is Contact Us - InsideHoops. Powered by vBulletin Version 3. User Name. Remember Me? Mark Forums Read. There has been a long term decline of community banks, which might be the more American equivalent of this kind of lending. The Small Business Administration also helps with loan guarantees. So the support is sort of there, but takes a different form, and maybe one could say the impersonal nature of it is both a strength and a weakness in comparison. Numbers of small businesses and their starts have been in decline too. I suspect this has to do with the difficulty of more and more Americans in attaining any savings from their wages let alone enough to set aside to help capitalize a small business. I suspect this has to do with the difficulty of more and more Americans in attaining any savings from their wages All the more important to support one another. Although, if everyone in a person's trust circle is more or less in the same boat, then tough luck: Some non profits are working in this space too. After Sandy, some orgs in NY were giving interest free loans to small biz people who lost their trucks etc. Americans are forced by law and convention into living a very specific kind of life. Lots of things they do and "own" require substantial investment of money and time. A regular not minimum wage is calibrated to just barely take care of all that, and modern marketing specializes in "educating" our tastes so that we can really tell the difference between e. Although on average they are poorer, residents of India have a great deal more freedom with respect to the costs of everyday life. No matter how basic their housing, transport, clothing, food, education, safety, etc. Many lives lived happily in India would be largely illegal in USA. I think it's counter-intuitive but in a high trust society you don't have a need to build these networks. In a low-trust society like India you have to build trust networks. When you take these trust networks over to a high-trust society, they just act as additional leverage in your life. I know Indian guys who lent each other large five figure sums to help business deals go along and, the most surprising to me, had one take on a mortgage for another in Menlo Park! The family it was for was a dual income software engineer family, just missing a credit history and starting capital. Because there is a general lack of trust of people outside one's immediate family and a usually very small circle of friends. Family members are pretty much exempt from labor laws. Hence the cost structure can be a lot lower by using family labor. Most restaurants in Europe are run by immigrant families, they couldn't turn a profit otherwise. Could this apply, or have applied, to farms? I bet that would have a lot of interesting social effects. In my area it already does. I thought that was wonderful--I'm a fan of frugality. I'm curious if this is common in the US in other immigrant communities. My dad's friend is an Indian farmer in Valdosta, GA. He has 10k acres of land, has his own private plane and flies Indian groceries to Houston once a week. He immigrated to the US back in the 60's. I had a chance to meet him and he had an extraordinary character. He had no formalities and greeted us at his farm house without a shirt on. He was old but fit and you can tell what he has gone through in his life to make a living. He spoke fluent spanish and everyone loved him in Valdosta. We spent 3 days there and went to restaurants in the evening. Everyone greeted him as if he was some kind of a hero in the town. It was really an amazing experience to have met him and his family - just shows how immigrants assimilate in the most remote places in the US, especially in a hostile place such as south Georgia in the 60's. This story is from Wow, cool story. I wonder under what visa or work permit scheme he went there. I had two uncles and an aunt who went to the US and stayed there, but they all went via the traditional grad student then H1-B then green card then citizen route, and were all white collar workers an engineer turned entrepreneur and two academics , not farmers. Didn't know there were schemes for farmers and such, then or now, for the US, although I think there might be for Canada. At least in the late 70's - early 80's, if you could find an employer to "sponsor" you basically agree to give you a job for a certain amount of time , then you could immigrate with a green card immediately. There was no specific "scheme" for particular occupations: I'd assume something similar was already in place during the 60's. Interesting, thanks. Yes absolutely. As an Indian American, I'm familiar with the Indian grocery store model. However, I grew up in a majority vietnamese area of Southern California, and most of my friends growing up were vietnamese. They had a few interesting hustles going on: A few families were involved in growing produce in their backyards, and grocery stores would source these fruits. Many of the fruits certainly not all popular in Vietnam would grow in the heat of SoCal, but they were not farmed commercially. My mom's friend told her that many vietnamese restaurants sourced their egg rolls from various aunties scattered around the community. The egg roll they made was very standardized, and they would sell many trays a day to the restaurants for cents on the dollar. Under the table? I think it would be very difficult to bring Vietnamese flora into the USA through legitimate channels. The fruit I was talking about is dragon fruit: Hotels work because they require capital and low overhead — they also have a limited scope of competition. Small farmers are being starved out and losing access to capital as small banks go away. The big players in the agriculture business are global now, and a farmer in Ohio or New York will have a hard time making money, as the big companies just need to outbid you for one harvest season, and make up the difference with their weekly harvests in California, Chile, etc. There are players people serving Chinese restaurants and the Amish doing well, but those markets are limited. The model doesn't work in commodity ag, but no model really works for that in the long term. It always takes more capital. Farms have been failing or "consolidating", if you prefer for years. The bogeyman didn't shutter those banks. The nonviability of buying a bigger combine and renting more land every couple of years shuttered those banks. Such a bank could have stayed open if at least once every few years its county was the only one in the Great Plains to get rain. That would have been a lucky bank I'm not sure what will disrupt commodity ag, but it sucks, and the sooner it transforms into something else the better. The most successful farmers I know now are raising goats for halal butchers. I'm going to start crossing my cattle with "wagyu" bulls. Don't sell commodities. Could you elaborate on your question? It is the exact same with convenience stores. Work hour days. Only have other family members work there. CodeCube 7 months ago. If you are interested in these kinds of stories, check out the documentary http: Just recommended this film today to someone! Definitely worth checking out, even outside your interest of what General Tso actually is. I find this interesting, because my family used to take road trips all the time annually in the '90s, less often since then , and we mostly stayed in motels that were part of national chains like Hampton Inn, La Quinta, Holiday Inn Express, Fairfield by Marriott, Best Western, etc. I guess the owners could have been, but that would mean they're hiring people outside of family. I'm wondering if this article applies to just independent motels or if it also includes franchises of the national chains at least, I assume the national chains use a franchise model. I'd be honestly surprised if independent motels were a full half of the number of motels in the US, since the chains are everywhere. DhirubhaiPatel 7 months ago. The anti-asian immigration laws were repealed only in [1] only to benefit Poles and Italians but then also ended up benefiting Indians and Chinese. Many of them came to USA during that time and toiled mostly in menial jobs. It was only around late 80s that they had gathered enough influence to buy motels and such and this motel takeover was much more visible during early s. In the Obama era recession the property prices dropped further and many Indians purchased even more motels. Also the Patel community is not really into high end motels like Hampton Inn. They are into Motel 6, Super 8, Choice Hotels, etc. In fact, most of the franchise owner's staff is non-Indian. Also, most of the money you can make is by not hiring outside help. On the same note, I recently watched this video covering how Cambodian immigrants ended up running so many donuts shops, especially here in SoCal: And Tippi Hedren bringing Vietnamese refugees into the nail salon business. I became aware of the Gujarati hospitality empire some decades ago, when my work involved community organizing in the rural US. I was finding that just about all the old motels on state highways were run by Gujaratis. And when I'd become a regular, some would share about their experience. And would invite my friends and me for dinner, which was heaven. Especially given that the alternatives were typically burgers, steaks or fried chicken. This book provides the investment philosophy behind the Patel success and how it can apply in other realms. The Dhandho Investor: I look forward to the next National Geographic article in this series where they document in detail how American Jews came to run a substantial proportion of U. I need to put this more judiciously: I am from gujarat, do not own any motel. In my experience I can definitely believe this to be true. Personally know so many people heho owns motels. No one who travels and stays in small-to-medium-sized hotels is shocked by this. I have a complaint, however. We have so many Indian-Americans distributed all over the nation, and it is still fairly difficult to find good Indian food outside big cities. I've wondered about this, but what I've heard is that few Indian families eat out very often. Indian food is labor intensive and uses expensive ingredients. Restaurants are also low margin businesses that don't scale well and are super risky, not something I'd advise someone to do unless they have a passion for it and ability to fail and carry on with life. I have not been to a single Indian restaurant that can compare to a home cooked Gujarati meal, especially made by someone who grew up there. I'd be thrilled if there were some restaurants that passed a much lower bar than that. I don't agree about expensive ingredients. Lots of restaurants not all! The labor costs are an issue. I cooked a curry with garden vegetables and Gulf shrimp over the weekend, and it took over an hour perhaps it would have been unpalatable to a real Indian person, but three hillbillies from the Ozarks liked it just fine. However, it's possible to purchase e. But yeah restaurants are difficult. Way too much competition in that space unless you really like running a restaurant. Chinese-Americans seem to have had some success, however. For home cooking, pressure cooking makes Indian meals much easier. In a restaurant you'd presumably make big batches. Pressure cookers make lots of stuff easier! They don't chop up vegetables though Maybe saffron, but it's used very sparingly in only a few dishes, and a little goes a long way. Generally, vegetables are more expensive than grains and more perishable. By mass, Indian food is mostly grains and pulses Rice, wheat, and split peas. You should try Rajdhani in Artesia, CA if you get a chance. But that's the only one I have found. Or Shahnawaz, not too far away. For the time I spent in India, most of them eat their meals at street stalls throughout the day. Those that do have home cooked meals, often have housemaids that do all of that super labor intensive cooking. Even the relatively poor, have even poorer people working below them at home! Good Indian food doesn't exist in the US. This is incredibly diminutive of Indian cuisine in America. I'm sorry Michelin star means squat for Indian food. I have tried both and they are pretty crappy. Ah yes, Indian cuisine like "Bombay Sliders. Dude I've lived in Singapore. You don't have to tell me about food. Hopefully you made it to Penang then. While I am in agreement that BC has plenty of authentic south asian cuisine, Seattle is not so terrible. Food recommendation: The cuisine is way older than the partition What is good in Seattle? Everything good is actually within a km radius of Microsoft HQ in Redmond, on the east side. There's a really good chaat place. Mayuri the grocery store does have a great selection of staples items. Naan and Curry has the best non-vegetarian South-Asian food in the Seattle area. It has branches in Renton and Issaquah. I have personally found it much better than Maza grill, mentioned in the other comment. I got 2 greeting cards from the franchise in 1 year. JohnJamesRambo 7 months ago. Can someone tell me why the surname of Patel is so predominant in the hotel owners? The article doesn't really explain why. We are from Indian state Gujarat. Patel is the most common last name in Gujarat. Sister A applied for the immigration visa for my dad's sister-in-law. My dad's sister-in-law and my dad's brother immigrated to the USA in the late 70s. They only have limited options for the job. So they work their butt off for a few years and buy a small motel. Fellow Gujju here. It is "one" of the most common last names in Gujarat. Probably it might be the most common last name of Gujjus outside Gujarat but I doubt it is so inside the state. The Gujaratis are known to be big on business as the bread and butter of life. Even the simplest of businesses is something they would rather pick up than learn an actual trade. Of the Gujaratis, the Patel's are known for being the biggest pursuers of business. Aside from being a common name, Patel is synonymous to owning a business. One of the ways that Gujaratis come to America is use the investments route, sort of like investment chain migration. One member takes an investment, migrates, sets up business, profits, then sends the money back home, for others to travel in the same visa program. Then two people come, twice the profit, twice the pace of bringing people over. These business groups form around family bonds typically. In India, last names were usually based on your occupation. And iirc, Patels used to be farmers or merchants. It's the most common Gujarati surname. That's why you would see some people having "Motiwala" as a last name which literally translates to "Pearl merchant". Patel here, Patel as a community has farming background, and usually are quite industrious people, and so are generally in the middle or upper middle class in India also. Most who are coming to USA already have good amount of money or somehow have access to it, but they do not have first world skill for high tech job or business, so for doing business, this is the only option, or grocery store or petrol pumps. This kind of financing not available to outsiders, and that kind of community effects are every where to be seen in many industries. For example, there was an article about how Portuguese immigrants have sort of dominated Dunkin franchises. Common Gujarati lastname 2. Good old fashioned nepotism. Patel is a common surname in one portion of India. The article misses several important points why the Gujariti could take over the whole south and west in all cheap hotels. The main reason is a special Visa execption, very similar to the Chinese cook visa exception. The forces that draw immigrant groups to certain occupations and businesses -- Indians to gas stations, Koreans and Dominicans to grocery stores and Afghans to fried chicken places -- are complex and varied. Their occupational choices are based on factors like skills and values learned in the old country, the paths followed by fellow immigrants who preceded them, or merely a lack of more attractive economic options. The common thread linking all immigrant work niches is the insider's edge on the profession. Ethnic labor, in particular family labor, is cheap and easily exploited and there is no linguistic, cultural or discriminatory barrier. It costs nothing virtually to go to a park and play basketball so the kids who were poorest played basketball. It costs nothing to run so the kids who were poorest ran track. It costs a great deal of money to play golf in equipment and course fees The same with swimming The reason that soccer is the most popular sport in the world is that it only costs having a ball to play it. The poorer people dominate in the sports that require the least amount of money to play. Take a look at boxing What do they have to 'get out' of in general Source s: Add a comment. Asker's rating. Indian Gas Stations. They are more familiar with retail shops, convenience stores etc. So they tend to gravitate towards convenience stores and fuel station of which there are many in their native lands and easy to grasp. Which makes it ripe for asians. Also for asians owning a massive fuel station has prestige, it s seen as a land owning jobs and asians traditionally look positively at land owners. The high case in India are landowners. So for Indians owning a petrol station is prestigious as it s a land owning occupation. Asians would look unfavourably to say a b2b web design business because they can t see the tangiable assets of the business. If you are a basketball playerthen your straight leap is important but if you do have this problem you do not need certainly to fear because the solution is here now https:.

If I took out a bank loan, even though it's technically the same action, those same people would perceive it as an admirable show of entrepreneurial initiative. While I completely see your point about the negative side of individualism, I think this attitude is also partly based on a very culturally healthy distaste for nepotism. When you ask your rich uncle for a loan, it's hard for both him and you Why do indians own gas stations really know whether it's being given because he believes in you, or because there is perceived to be an obligation.

I'm not saying that relatives shouldn't Why do indians own gas stations each other, but perhaps it's not such a bad thing that people seek out other avenues first in non-emergency situations. It's a delicate balance to be sure. I think it's much deeper than "individualist streak in American culture".

Sexting images Watch Video 21sextury0. Just a decade ago, gas station ownership usually mirrored the ethnic makeup of the surrounding neighborhood. But now, about 40 percent of the city's stations are run or owned by South Asians, estimated Linda Sachs, a spokeswoman for the the city's Department of Consumer Affairs. This turnover in gas station ownership is one of the many images of a changing New York. While the new immigrants come from a vast spectrum of countries, with a heavy emphasis on Asian, South American and Caribbean nations, and work in a variety of jobs, they have also developed their own specialized niches, virtually monopolizing certain businesses or professions and slowly changing the commercial, political and cultural profile of the city. The forces that draw immigrant groups to certain occupations and businesses -- Indians to gas stations, Koreans and Dominicans to grocery stores and Afghans to fried chicken places -- are complex and varied. Their occupational choices are based on factors like skills and values learned in the old country, the paths followed by fellow immigrants who preceded them, or merely a lack of more attractive economic options. Sociologists agree that there is no universal pattern to these ethnic niches and that often labor specialization is random and hinges on availability of positions in certain localities. Indians, for example, may be preeminent in gas stations in New York, but in Los Angeles those business are dominated by a Korean quasi-monopoly. But once a niche is found, it creates a snowball effect, gathering in labor from that ethnic group and expanding exponentially. The common thread linking all immigrant work niches is the insider's edge on the profession. Ethnic labor, in particular family labor, is cheap and easily exploited and there is no linguistic, cultural or discriminatory barrier. Many immigrants are self-employed entrepreneurs. More than 85 percent of the 1, green grocer stores in the metropolitan area are owned and run by Koreans, sociologists say. The more than , Koreans who have come to New York also own novelty shops, beauty salons, liquor stores and dry cleaning. Indians and Pakistanis -- close to 95, of whom reside in the city -- have a virtual monopoly on newsstands. Since the mid's, they have been buying into gas stations, and their growing presence in the jewelry trade has made them the second largest ethnic group -- after Hasidic Jews -- in the Diamond District. Guyanese -- the fourth largest immigrant group -- can be found throughout the city's pharmacies and machinery repair shops. They also stand out, along with the Jamaicans and Irish, in the child-care business. Even the smallest of immigrant groups, like the Afghans and the Senegalese, have carved out their own niches. There are fewer than 4, Afghans in the city -- almost all war refugees -- yet they own more than fast-food chicken restaurants, Afghan businessmen say, in particular a non-franchised chain of more than 40 called Kennedy's Fried Chicken. The Senegalese, many of them already traders by profession, came to the United States via Europe and have prospered hawking a variety of wares on street corners throughout the city. Korean Success: Toil and Innovation. One of the the most visible successes has been the Koreans. An estimated , Koreans have come to the metropolitan area since the 's and 65 percent of Korean families own at least one business, said Pyong Gap Min, a professor of sociology at Queens College, who is a specialist on Koreans in the United States. Few Korean green grocers owned such stores in their homeland. But they arrived in the United States at a propitious time, when many Greeks, Italians and Jews were leaving the grocery business. Most were highly educated professionals with limited English skills and no business experience. But they had money to invest. The grocery stores were attractive because, although they required long, hard hours, they could be run with only basic shards of English. In the United States, they revamped and spruced up the stores, filling the demand for items beyond the basics of the old grocery store. Find More Posts by emsteez forreal. ATL Posts: I have heard some Dooms-like theories regarding this. Find More Posts by phoenix Jan Posts: Find More Posts by Akrazotile. Dec Posts: Find More Posts by DukeDelonte Providence, RI Posts: Find More Posts by code green. Aug Location: NYC Posts: Why do all Chinese restaurants look the same? Find More Posts by Patrick Chewing. Mar Location: Am I here to amuse you? The most successful farmers I know now are raising goats for halal butchers. I'm going to start crossing my cattle with "wagyu" bulls. Don't sell commodities. Could you elaborate on your question? It is the exact same with convenience stores. Work hour days. Only have other family members work there. CodeCube 7 months ago. If you are interested in these kinds of stories, check out the documentary http: Just recommended this film today to someone! Definitely worth checking out, even outside your interest of what General Tso actually is. I find this interesting, because my family used to take road trips all the time annually in the '90s, less often since then , and we mostly stayed in motels that were part of national chains like Hampton Inn, La Quinta, Holiday Inn Express, Fairfield by Marriott, Best Western, etc. I guess the owners could have been, but that would mean they're hiring people outside of family. I'm wondering if this article applies to just independent motels or if it also includes franchises of the national chains at least, I assume the national chains use a franchise model. I'd be honestly surprised if independent motels were a full half of the number of motels in the US, since the chains are everywhere. DhirubhaiPatel 7 months ago. The anti-asian immigration laws were repealed only in [1] only to benefit Poles and Italians but then also ended up benefiting Indians and Chinese. Many of them came to USA during that time and toiled mostly in menial jobs. It was only around late 80s that they had gathered enough influence to buy motels and such and this motel takeover was much more visible during early s. In the Obama era recession the property prices dropped further and many Indians purchased even more motels. Also the Patel community is not really into high end motels like Hampton Inn. They are into Motel 6, Super 8, Choice Hotels, etc. In fact, most of the franchise owner's staff is non-Indian. Also, most of the money you can make is by not hiring outside help. On the same note, I recently watched this video covering how Cambodian immigrants ended up running so many donuts shops, especially here in SoCal: And Tippi Hedren bringing Vietnamese refugees into the nail salon business. I became aware of the Gujarati hospitality empire some decades ago, when my work involved community organizing in the rural US. I was finding that just about all the old motels on state highways were run by Gujaratis. And when I'd become a regular, some would share about their experience. And would invite my friends and me for dinner, which was heaven. Especially given that the alternatives were typically burgers, steaks or fried chicken. This book provides the investment philosophy behind the Patel success and how it can apply in other realms. The Dhandho Investor: I look forward to the next National Geographic article in this series where they document in detail how American Jews came to run a substantial proportion of U. I need to put this more judiciously: I am from gujarat, do not own any motel. In my experience I can definitely believe this to be true. Personally know so many people heho owns motels. No one who travels and stays in small-to-medium-sized hotels is shocked by this. I have a complaint, however. We have so many Indian-Americans distributed all over the nation, and it is still fairly difficult to find good Indian food outside big cities. I've wondered about this, but what I've heard is that few Indian families eat out very often. Indian food is labor intensive and uses expensive ingredients. Restaurants are also low margin businesses that don't scale well and are super risky, not something I'd advise someone to do unless they have a passion for it and ability to fail and carry on with life. I have not been to a single Indian restaurant that can compare to a home cooked Gujarati meal, especially made by someone who grew up there. I'd be thrilled if there were some restaurants that passed a much lower bar than that. I don't agree about expensive ingredients. Lots of restaurants not all! The labor costs are an issue. I cooked a curry with garden vegetables and Gulf shrimp over the weekend, and it took over an hour perhaps it would have been unpalatable to a real Indian person, but three hillbillies from the Ozarks liked it just fine. However, it's possible to purchase e. But yeah restaurants are difficult. Way too much competition in that space unless you really like running a restaurant. Chinese-Americans seem to have had some success, however. For home cooking, pressure cooking makes Indian meals much easier. In a restaurant you'd presumably make big batches. Pressure cookers make lots of stuff easier! They don't chop up vegetables though Maybe saffron, but it's used very sparingly in only a few dishes, and a little goes a long way. Generally, vegetables are more expensive than grains and more perishable. By mass, Indian food is mostly grains and pulses Rice, wheat, and split peas. You should try Rajdhani in Artesia, CA if you get a chance. But that's the only one I have found. Or Shahnawaz, not too far away. For the time I spent in India, most of them eat their meals at street stalls throughout the day. Those that do have home cooked meals, often have housemaids that do all of that super labor intensive cooking. Even the relatively poor, have even poorer people working below them at home! Good Indian food doesn't exist in the US. This is incredibly diminutive of Indian cuisine in America. I'm sorry Michelin star means squat for Indian food. I have tried both and they are pretty crappy. Ah yes, Indian cuisine like "Bombay Sliders. Dude I've lived in Singapore. You don't have to tell me about food. Hopefully you made it to Penang then. While I am in agreement that BC has plenty of authentic south asian cuisine, Seattle is not so terrible. Food recommendation: The cuisine is way older than the partition What is good in Seattle? Everything good is actually within a km radius of Microsoft HQ in Redmond, on the east side. There's a really good chaat place. Mayuri the grocery store does have a great selection of staples items. Naan and Curry has the best non-vegetarian South-Asian food in the Seattle area. It has branches in Renton and Issaquah. I have personally found it much better than Maza grill, mentioned in the other comment. I got 2 greeting cards from the franchise in 1 year. JohnJamesRambo 7 months ago. Can someone tell me why the surname of Patel is so predominant in the hotel owners? The article doesn't really explain why. We are from Indian state Gujarat. Patel is the most common last name in Gujarat. Sister A applied for the immigration visa for my dad's sister-in-law. My dad's sister-in-law and my dad's brother immigrated to the USA in the late 70s. They only have limited options for the job. So they work their butt off for a few years and buy a small motel. Fellow Gujju here. It is "one" of the most common last names in Gujarat. Probably it might be the most common last name of Gujjus outside Gujarat but I doubt it is so inside the state. The Gujaratis are known to be big on business as the bread and butter of life. Even the simplest of businesses is something they would rather pick up than learn an actual trade. Of the Gujaratis, the Patel's are known for being the biggest pursuers of business. Aside from being a common name, Patel is synonymous to owning a business. One of the ways that Gujaratis come to America is use the investments route, sort of like investment chain migration. One member takes an investment, migrates, sets up business, profits, then sends the money back home, for others to travel in the same visa program. Then two people come, twice the profit, twice the pace of bringing people over. These business groups form around family bonds typically. In India, last names were usually based on your occupation. And iirc, Patels used to be farmers or merchants. It's the most common Gujarati surname. That's why you would see some people having "Motiwala" as a last name which literally translates to "Pearl merchant". Patel here, Patel as a community has farming background, and usually are quite industrious people, and so are generally in the middle or upper middle class in India also. Most who are coming to USA already have good amount of money or somehow have access to it, but they do not have first world skill for high tech job or business, so for doing business, this is the only option, or grocery store or petrol pumps. This kind of financing not available to outsiders, and that kind of community effects are every where to be seen in many industries. For example, there was an article about how Portuguese immigrants have sort of dominated Dunkin franchises. Common Gujarati lastname 2. Good old fashioned nepotism. Patel is a common surname in one portion of India. The article misses several important points why the Gujariti could take over the whole south and west in all cheap hotels. The main reason is a special Visa execption, very similar to the Chinese cook visa exception. Family members can easily come over and work there. So they can undercut all costs in running a hotel, esp. The big chains saw this advantage and put a Gujariti manager everywhere. They replaced room cleaning step by step and are also doing the small repairs by themselves. They have a strong community to help each other out. Biggest problem is room cleaning though. It's a different experience, it smells. Who knows what kind of chemicals they use. For sure the wrong ones. So what else is new? How come every other cop - especially in the North east - is named Dennehy or O'Reilly; every other landscaping firm is owned by people with surnames like Caruso or Zanatta; every other construction firm in California esp. Ethnic professions are nothing new, and part and parcel of American immigrant history. Just another chapter My understanding is that immigrants often have a high rate of entrepreneurship. It's always nice to hear about people coming to the US and not just taking a chance coming to the US, but also taking advantage of those freedoms to take the risk of starting a business and the massive amount of work that it takes to do so. The environment back home is so fu d up, that , whole family working 12 hours a day seems like real stress reliever. My uncle who went USA and doing the motel thing, used to have business in India. While it's certainly true that people from Gujarat are business minded, I have observed that they are equally narrow minded, especially when it comes to selecting whom they work with and they almost always select a fellow Gujarati. I have personal experience with this, I had a Gujarati classmate and we had plans for starting up after our college, he later went on to work for his brother in law who you already guessed it worked in the hospitality industry , he only told me later when I asked that he was pressured by his family to work with them exclusively. You may think that this is a one off example, but it's not, nearly all people I came across had similar mindset. Also they contributed largely to the election of Modi as a PM in India, who is also drumroll a Gujarati, now this may be good or bad depending on how you look at it. After living in western countries for well over 50 years calling themselves American, Canadian and British etc , they ooze pride about their entrepreneurial heritage; but they still vote and contribute money towards electing a man whose past screams bloody murder and that is plain hypocrisy! Ramesh 7 months ago. Most Gujus do not stay in Gujarat, they are business people buying and selling only no production. RickJWagner 7 months ago. I love stories where hard work pays off. Hats off to this family. JoeAltmaier 7 months ago. Anybody have any real statistics on this? I have a datapoint. His surname was Patel. That is, things work by convention, affiliation and duty. They don't work through formal agreements, roles and contracts. Family is a true economic unit, with productive capacity, credit potential and such. Affiliations with other families are important. Its not necessarily worse than a Banks's. Gujarati here. Our success in Motel and Gas Station industry can be attributed to the following. The same model then also can be seen in tech industry. I have explained below: There is no two factor auth each time you do a credit card transaction, you can do self checkouts at Walmart etc. Many of first world citizens might take this for granted but these factors give a huge boost to economy. There are more transactions and less wealth is destroyed just to enforce a contract. We Gujjus take this to the next level in USA. Consider John Smith decides to run a gas station. Not to mention these attendants steal cash and other stuff from the gas station store often too. Jose steals his cash one day and is never seen again or is caught by ICE and deported. Now Dhirubhai Patel buys the same gas station. He makes a phone call and finds another Gujju student who is currently on F1 and legally can not earn and is paying heavy rent in bay area. He agrees to man his gas station at night and sleep in there too. He saves on rent and takes literally no salary until he completes his masters. Also the gujju students is much less prone to stealing and cheating and on other hand is more thankful to Dhirubhai. After completing his masters this kid joins a reputed tech company and later employs Dhirubhai's daughter as an intern. Everyone wins. I see a lot of hate for Indian tech workers among white nativists tech workers on apps like Team Blind and also on twitter search for HR on twitter. They correctly point out that Indians have been succeeding at a much greater rate than natives. They claim that Indian managers tend to hire Indian employees even in top firms like Google etc. That might be true as Indians quickly build trust among each other. It is common for a new H1B from India to work for a startup at least for years just because founders helped him come to USA even though salary is lower I did this. Both my founders were Indians and the company was successfully acquired. I left within 6 months of acquisition to join one of the FANGs. I think the lack of proper deterministic path to green card actually forces smaller ethnic groups to huddle together instead of being more individualistic. This in some way prevents assimilation. There are over K tech H1Bs who are here for decade or more and yet wont get their green cards. Same goes for motels, farming, gas stations and many other businesses which are being completely cornered by Indian-Americans. Every ethnic immigrant group huddles together, regardless of visa status. That is basic human nature. Just to clear any confusion I am not saying the success comes at the expense of breaking the law. In some cases it is true but at fundamental level it is about "establishing trust". You can break a lot of victim-less laws and get away with it when you can establish trust. Most often these are minimum wage laws and immigration laws both of which in my opinion some of the worst laws in the world. Also for asians owning a massive fuel station has prestige, it s seen as a land owning jobs and asians traditionally look positively at land owners. The high case in India are landowners. So for Indians owning a petrol station is prestigious as it s a land owning occupation. Asians would look unfavourably to say a b2b web design business because they can t see the tangiable assets of the business. If you are a basketball playerthen your straight leap is important but if you do have this problem you do not need certainly to fear because the solution is here now https: With Vert Shock program you'll gain 9 to 15 inches to your straight leap in only 8 week. This program is structured in 3 stages. And, ultimately, there's the Post-Shock period, that is simply for sealing in your newly obtained gains and creating parts of your muscles used to the quickly neurological response. Basic and simple Vert Shock gets the job performed! For the best answers, search on this site https: However, you are making some strong generalizations. Eastern Indians are involved in many businesses, not just gas stations. As well, the owners of gas stations are distributed across our nation with a greater number of these businesses clustered around highly populated areas. There are many Indians involved in technological production. Bose sound systems is owned by Eastern Indians. Many Internet providers are owned and managed by Eastern Indians. They participate in companies that manage stock portfolios, as well as Asians. A lot of nail salons are owned by blacks, and other cultures. These salons are not dominated by Asian ownership. Blacks are active participants and owners of many manufacturing companies. One of the largest distribute rs of used automobile parts is owned by a black owner. It is a multi million dollar business, has no debt, and I have stock in this company. So, my suggestion is for you to seek confirmation of your generalizations. You will learn a lot..

Western Europe in the last years or so has been a very unusual place Because crudely speaking the catholic church wished to diminish alternative power structures, such as clans. This led to an unusually open society, which had many benefits But it has some costs, too.

Like not having tight connections for bootstrapping motels in a foreign land. Unless you have some references, I'd call this a "nice theory" to be read with a British accent. Something changed, long before The peripheral was different, e.

Scotland had strong clans click they got kicked out to Ulster, and thence Appalachia And Spain go here even christian at this point in time. That the church did it is less clear, I agree. There are economic arguments too.

I guess I'm persuaded that things like suppressing cousin marriage had something to do with it. I'm certainly not suggesting that there's some essential magic attached to the pope! It was core europe that invented Protestantism too Extended family may be a thing in Western Europe and derived cultural areas but clans are not.

Descent based political groupings are for backwoods peasants at best, not the commanding heights of the polity, unlike every other meta cultural grouping. The recipe for setting and enforcing a policy over vast areas of time and continue reading is incentive compatibility.

It is always in the interest of one powerful political group to make coordinated action against it more difficult. The Catholic Church had just click for source strong incentive to break up extended kin groups and they did. It was possible to get dispensations for royalty and the peasantry mostly did whatever it wanted.

Keeping up the same policy for over a thousand years was enough to make Western Europe and especially Northwestern Europe uniquely atomised in human history. If you want an academic source look below. AlexCoventry 7 months ago. He would have tipped his hand as a purveyor Why do indians own gas stations speculative, just-so, white-supremacist garbage, if he'd cited her.

Also, there is nothing in that paper to support your claim about the policies of the Catholic Church. If you want to know more about the policies of Why do indians own gas stations Catholic Church on marriage of relatives the Wikipedia article on Why do indians own gas stations marriage is quite good and Why do indians own gas stations referenced if you want to go from there.

By the 11th century, with Why do indians own gas stations adoption of the so-called canon-law method of computing consanguinity, these proscriptions had been extended even to sixth cousins, including by marriage. But due to the many resulting difficulties in reckoning who was related to whom, they were relaxed back to third cousins at the Fourth Lateran Council in AD Pope Benedict XV reduced this to second cousins in ,[22] and finally, the current law was enacted in If St.

Augustine by the fifth century. Hypothesis falsification and all that. Just so stories is a common insult thrown against evolutionary psychology researchers but far from universally justified. If it's not verifiable even in principle, Why do indians own gas stations useless from a scientific perspective.

And it Why do indians own gas stations happens to be a theory telling white people why they're genetically disposed to morally superiority, which is highly suspicious, coming from a white guy.

You're not taking the enormous hypothesis space into account. This is not a compelling fit, by any means. The introduction is only about 60 pages and addresses the most common and uncommon criticisms ably. Dude, I've written papers on population genetics.

I know exactly how hard what he's trying to do is. He's full of it. I'm click here that Alex.

Check out: The Origins of Political Order by Francis Fukuyama, which has a pretty long section about how the Catholic Church in medieval Europe worked really see more to break up the power of clans.

It is one reason why they forced priests to become celebate. South America's conversion to Catholicism came long after this period was largely over. Do you -- and 50 other descendents -- take a plane trip every year to go to your grandfather's grave 1, miles away to pray to him on the anniversary of the day he died for good luck?

We do that here. By Calvinists I assume you are referring to Protestants? Or are you actually referring to Calvinistic Protestants? Just curious, outside of Christian circles and history I don't Why do indians own gas stations I have ever seen someone reference Calvinists.

IkmoIkmo 7 months ago. Might be different in the US, in Europe it's not too uncommon to talk about calvinists, particularly in certain countries like the Netherlands it's a well-established term which is even used there to describe Dutch behavioral culture, because it's deemed to be so fittingand separate from other forms of protestantism.

Calvinists get plentifully referenced in general circles when you grow up in Geneva. I received a protestant education and as such Calvinism is part of the curriculum. There are several things wrong with this line of thinking as others have pointed outbut I'd like to draw attention to a less salient Why do indians own gas stations you made: It's interesting that you're portraying the openness of European society in a strongly positive light, given the high levels of abject loneliness prevalent primarily in the west.

The biggest risk to the future of the West is the lack of strong families. That's where India, above all others, shines. Well this is fun, see other answers.

I agree that the extreme individualist end of the spectrum has downsides, for sure. Suicide rates make horrifying reading. But I think you can argue it's part of what made the west successful -- in HN terms, being forced to learn to deal with strangers, a lot, set you up to scale well. Isn't the flip side of being on the other end of this scale -- tight happy families, or clans, maybe even castes -- Why do indians own gas stations close to nepotism?

Stagnation because once you've employed all your nephews then you can't grow, who would Why do indians own gas stations trust? Of course there are a million other factors etc too This is true. Since the article talks about Patels.

Back in India after holding powerful position in politics, administration etc for long time in Gujarat, Patels are lately agitating violently to be declared "backward caste". So that they can be entitled for more government support in jobs, education etc.

I never connected the decline of extended families to the church, but that sounds Why do indians own gas stations. Any recommended reading? It's because it's not. Literally all the cultures in which Catholicism thrives are those in which the extended family is paramount. My very large very Catholic very Indian family actively rails against the individualism of secular American culture.

As do my Philipino friends who also have very close families. As do my Hispanic family and friends who also have very close families. As do my African friends who also have close extended Why do indians own gas stations.

Literally the biggest group embracing individualism from my perspective are secular white people and mainstream protestants.

knockouts nude Watch Video Senam Sexy. Feb Posts: Find More Posts by Knuck the Ficks. Apr Location: I walk the earth Kung Fu style Posts: Join Date: Jul Location: Find More Posts by emsteez forreal. ATL Posts: I have heard some Dooms-like theories regarding this. Find More Posts by phoenix Jan Posts: Find More Posts by Akrazotile. Dec Posts: Find More Posts by DukeDelonte Providence, RI Posts: Find More Posts by code green. A lot of nail salons are owned by blacks, and other cultures. These salons are not dominated by Asian ownership. Blacks are active participants and owners of many manufacturing companies. One of the largest distribute rs of used automobile parts is owned by a black owner. It is a multi million dollar business, has no debt, and I have stock in this company. So, my suggestion is for you to seek confirmation of your generalizations. You will learn a lot. Statistics eg. Most of what you say is only true in the US. In China, Asians work at Gas Stations, Nail places, and play basketball and football not baseball - but that's the national sport in Japan, so plenty of Asians play it there. Golf is expensive, so only wealthy people get to play it very often. So, in the US, it's mostly to do with history and how it effected statistics. Those business people and golfers you're talking about grew up in wealthy families - and because of history white people are still wealthier than black people in the US but in various countries in Africa and the Middle East, black people run all the businesses and play golf and cricket. And I come from Australia - with a population the size of a city in China, the US, or Russia, we always manage to pull a solid 4th place in the Olympics So we do good at sports not because we're black, white, Asian or other, but because we're Australian!!! More to do with culture, history and statistics, than anything to do with race. Just get out of here, dude. You make me want to talk about plotting to destroy the white house like you were talking to everybody about earlier, trying to recruit people just so the government catches you. Google it or Yahoo it. Winning Sport Picks http: People get influenced by their surroundings and their friends, thats why And success depends on involvement, and involvement is easy when you are part of that group. Pagination 1. Existing questions. Bill Gates and Paul Allen certainly had to work their tails off, but negating that having a wealthy parent puts you in a far higher likelihood to be successful is just silly. The average child of poor parents is not likely to have the same opportunity as those of a child of wealthy parents. It's exactly what perpetuates the cycle of wealth. Lots of people started microcomputer companies at about the same time as Gates. Evidently, not attending Lakeside was not a barrier. Hardly "immense". My parents bought a car for me to drive back when I was a teen. I wrote "new" car. What valuation do you give his mother's influence over the board at IBM? It's unknowable. But keep in mind that Microsoft was already established and very successful at the time, and Gates was a very astute and aggressive businessman. Microsoft was the biggest player in microcomputer software at the time. Why wouldn't they check? And how much credence would IBM give a mom who had little knowledge of computers and software who suggested checking out her son? Lastly, the accounts of her advising IBM to use her son's company are not verifiable. IBM went to Gary Kildall first. I really dislike this argument. Yet, this is a consistent argument whenever an employer-employee relationship comes up. That's not because manual labour is beneath me. The thing is - at a low enough price point, no work is worth anyone's time. Those family members were probably working for below minimum wage. It's not culture. It's economics. For the family member, it's more like receiving massive equity stake with little to no salary. A friend of mine had his great uncle come to America penniless in the '80s. They own apartment buildings in Queens now. That's because a year-old kid is going to come home, finish homework, and then man the store for three hours, taking over from his older sister. Daycare is free because the year-old will manage the year-old and the year-old will manage the 6-year-old when the teenager is out. It's a tough life, and I don't wish it upon my kids but that shit went straight to equity. Those kids are now well off middle aged people, and when their parents the original immigrants pass, the grandkids will be fabulously wealthy. It is about economics and expectations. It is the same reason there is a "shortage" in technology yet thousands of Indians applying for those jobs -- because most American students dont want to live in outer San Jose, San Martin, or Rucker and commute for 4hrs or live in nasty apartments. Most Americans also dont want to be tied on Production Support getting calls all night for crap wages. And frankly, I dont blame you. I'm a computer science grad in the US. The bay area wages, even while inflated, are not living wages for families, certainly nothing given my excellent education I'm in management. I work half the hours, and earn a good pay. It's almost like that's the price the market is willing to bear! Yet, we only use this sort of judgmental language to express outrage at employees, unwilling to work at a price below what the market is willing to bear. You realize I'm agreeing with you right? You are looking at the Palo Alto market, or San Jose market. I'm Indian American. I grew up in the US and got a top-3 school CS degree. I'm unwilling to live like my father. Hence I dont compete with H1s on the "jobs going unfilled" because they dont meet my expectations. Luckily I and probably you have options. My father didnt. We're lucky and we can be picky with where we live. You and I are unwilling to do so. Others will. The specific term for what you're talking about is arbitrage. You're making a high wage in the city, but choosing to live in a lower cost of living area and keeping the difference. As someone who commuted hours each way for years, this absolutely works and you don't even need to be a specific ethnicity. I've worked my way up from crappy jobs cleaning up sewer damage, to a call center, then an IT dept, and now into IT management. Nevermind that scheduling family members to work can be much easier than a worker you hire, which lets a small business run with fewer employees working more valuable hours. The killer app here seems to be access to capital on amazing terms. They don't say how big is the loan, nor how many were needed to buy the hotel. They might have had to shake hands with everyone in their family. AdamM12 7 months ago. Worked in restaurant industry. Latino workers had a pool of money that the all put into and if I remember correctly they rotated who the paid it out to for big purchases like this. I think they mainly used it for like cars and homes. I had an ex-girlfriend whose family did this. I had no idea it was a cultural thing she was from Mexico. I just just thought it was specific to her family. If I remember correctly though, it caused a far amount of problems because people would often stop paying after their turn. Yeah I can imagine. Really has to be close nit so you can put social pressures. These are called https: Pretty common in countries where access to the formal banking sector, especially for women who are home-makers, is complicated. Awesome didn't know what the formal name was. Excellent observation! This is the basis of "chit funds" https: Similar schemes also apparently exist in countries like S Korea per my Korean neighbor. But in the motel instances outlined here, anecdotally, lending circles are not used. It's typically a small group of family members or very close friends with a pool of money to "lend". Yes, having family members work for you for free is legal. My accountant once encouraged me to try to get my family members involved in a business I ran just for that reason. I think the question of age comes into play though. But there are an awful lot of very young family members working on commercial farms. This was on a farm. As an adult, it seems that anything kids might do around the house, they might do in a family-owned motel. If there are laws against that they are bad laws and also inconsistently enforced. There's a family business exception. Underaged labor is legal in the USA as long as they are employed by their parents and the work isn't in manufacturing, mining or occupations declared hazardous. You could make the argument that startup founders who aren't taking a salary from their early stage startup are also performing "free, illegally so" labor. I think in that case, you can't work for yourself illegally. HeyLaughingBoy 7 months ago. If the startup is incorporated, then you're working for the corporation, not for "yourself. The original blockchain: There's an interesting ancient pattern of small minority groups dominating certain businesses, often ones which need trust -- here "handshake loans", but traditionally also simply payment for goods shipped long-distances. The Greek trader in one little Egyptian town could be more confident in dealing with another Greek trader somewhere in Italy, a week's sail away, because while he might be tempted to run off with the money, word would get around, and soon no other Greek would trust the guy, nobody would marry his sons This mechanism didn't work for people from the majority community, because they weren't so specialised, could do other business, could find another priest Thus the Greeks could ship things cheaper, and won the business. The Patels, and related Gujarati groups, have been in this kind of trust-heavy long-distance trade for centuries. They spread all over East Africa in the 19th C, and did very well. It's sort of common knowledge in India that Gujaratis, Sindhis, Punjabis and Malayalis Keralites are generally pretty enterprising and are often businessmen, both within India and abroad. There can be other such Indian communities too, of course. These are just the ones I have heard of from childhood as tending to be more so. Again, I don't mean to rule out other places where these or other Indians could have gone, these are just the ones I am more familiar with, and may have relatively high concentrations. Be interesting to know if there are other places where particular groups have gone and done well. Of course, lots of Indians went to Fiji and Malaysia too, I've read, although those may have mostly gone as plantation labor initially and some to Trinidad and Tobago, Guyana, etc. Don't know how those are doing now. I guess it is both because they use some different local Malaysian ingredients, and because of the long time of separation from India must have made their cuisine evolved to be somewhat different. It was interesting stuff, though. Yes indeed, they specialise within India too. And surely some of the same network benefits may apply there too. Surely Parsi entrepreneurs a century ago got better loans It's also my hazy impression that the plantation-labor Indian groups haven't done nearly as well on the whole. Another example is the surprisingly high proportion of overseas Chinese who are from Fujian. Could be. I do know that Parsis are said to take care of the elderly and poor of their community. They have retirement homes and do charity for them, etc. They are generally philantropic too, like some others. Good of them. I recently learned about oulipo https: Lack of resources can be sometimes a blessing in disguise whether it is literature or hard business. I wonder why Americans don't do this maybe they do, I don't know - why borrow from banks or VCs etc with strict strings attached, instead of supporting one another based on trust? There has been a long term decline of community banks, which might be the more American equivalent of this kind of lending. The Small Business Administration also helps with loan guarantees. So the support is sort of there, but takes a different form, and maybe one could say the impersonal nature of it is both a strength and a weakness in comparison. Numbers of small businesses and their starts have been in decline too. I suspect this has to do with the difficulty of more and more Americans in attaining any savings from their wages let alone enough to set aside to help capitalize a small business. I suspect this has to do with the difficulty of more and more Americans in attaining any savings from their wages All the more important to support one another. Although, if everyone in a person's trust circle is more or less in the same boat, then tough luck: Some non profits are working in this space too. After Sandy, some orgs in NY were giving interest free loans to small biz people who lost their trucks etc. Americans are forced by law and convention into living a very specific kind of life. Lots of things they do and "own" require substantial investment of money and time. A regular not minimum wage is calibrated to just barely take care of all that, and modern marketing specializes in "educating" our tastes so that we can really tell the difference between e. Although on average they are poorer, residents of India have a great deal more freedom with respect to the costs of everyday life. No matter how basic their housing, transport, clothing, food, education, safety, etc. Many lives lived happily in India would be largely illegal in USA. I think it's counter-intuitive but in a high trust society you don't have a need to build these networks. In a low-trust society like India you have to build trust networks. When you take these trust networks over to a high-trust society, they just act as additional leverage in your life. I know Indian guys who lent each other large five figure sums to help business deals go along and, the most surprising to me, had one take on a mortgage for another in Menlo Park! The family it was for was a dual income software engineer family, just missing a credit history and starting capital. Because there is a general lack of trust of people outside one's immediate family and a usually very small circle of friends. Family members are pretty much exempt from labor laws. Hence the cost structure can be a lot lower by using family labor. Most restaurants in Europe are run by immigrant families, they couldn't turn a profit otherwise. Could this apply, or have applied, to farms? I bet that would have a lot of interesting social effects. In my area it already does. I thought that was wonderful--I'm a fan of frugality. I'm curious if this is common in the US in other immigrant communities. My dad's friend is an Indian farmer in Valdosta, GA. He has 10k acres of land, has his own private plane and flies Indian groceries to Houston once a week. He immigrated to the US back in the 60's. I had a chance to meet him and he had an extraordinary character. He had no formalities and greeted us at his farm house without a shirt on. He was old but fit and you can tell what he has gone through in his life to make a living. He spoke fluent spanish and everyone loved him in Valdosta. We spent 3 days there and went to restaurants in the evening. Everyone greeted him as if he was some kind of a hero in the town. It was really an amazing experience to have met him and his family - just shows how immigrants assimilate in the most remote places in the US, especially in a hostile place such as south Georgia in the 60's. This story is from Wow, cool story. I wonder under what visa or work permit scheme he went there. I had two uncles and an aunt who went to the US and stayed there, but they all went via the traditional grad student then H1-B then green card then citizen route, and were all white collar workers an engineer turned entrepreneur and two academics , not farmers. Didn't know there were schemes for farmers and such, then or now, for the US, although I think there might be for Canada. At least in the late 70's - early 80's, if you could find an employer to "sponsor" you basically agree to give you a job for a certain amount of time , then you could immigrate with a green card immediately. There was no specific "scheme" for particular occupations: I'd assume something similar was already in place during the 60's. Interesting, thanks. Yes absolutely. As an Indian American, I'm familiar with the Indian grocery store model. However, I grew up in a majority vietnamese area of Southern California, and most of my friends growing up were vietnamese. They had a few interesting hustles going on: A few families were involved in growing produce in their backyards, and grocery stores would source these fruits. Many of the fruits certainly not all popular in Vietnam would grow in the heat of SoCal, but they were not farmed commercially. My mom's friend told her that many vietnamese restaurants sourced their egg rolls from various aunties scattered around the community. The egg roll they made was very standardized, and they would sell many trays a day to the restaurants for cents on the dollar. Under the table? I think it would be very difficult to bring Vietnamese flora into the USA through legitimate channels. The fruit I was talking about is dragon fruit: Hotels work because they require capital and low overhead — they also have a limited scope of competition. Small farmers are being starved out and losing access to capital as small banks go away. The big players in the agriculture business are global now, and a farmer in Ohio or New York will have a hard time making money, as the big companies just need to outbid you for one harvest season, and make up the difference with their weekly harvests in California, Chile, etc. There are players people serving Chinese restaurants and the Amish doing well, but those markets are limited. The model doesn't work in commodity ag, but no model really works for that in the long term. It always takes more capital. Farms have been failing or "consolidating", if you prefer for years. The bogeyman didn't shutter those banks. The nonviability of buying a bigger combine and renting more land every couple of years shuttered those banks. Such a bank could have stayed open if at least once every few years its county was the only one in the Great Plains to get rain. That would have been a lucky bank I'm not sure what will disrupt commodity ag, but it sucks, and the sooner it transforms into something else the better. By , Mr. Singh, with an Indian partner, owned 13 gas stations in the New York area. He has competitors, however -- chiefly, other Punjabi Sikhs who began buying and working in gas stations in the city at the same time he did, some of whom now own as many as Growing Economic Force. Indian ownership of gas stations reflects the enormous ethnic transformation of the city during the last decade. With one million newcomers, the latest wave of immigration is the second largest in New York City history. Just a decade ago, gas station ownership usually mirrored the ethnic makeup of the surrounding neighborhood. But now, about 40 percent of the city's stations are run or owned by South Asians, estimated Linda Sachs, a spokeswoman for the the city's Department of Consumer Affairs. This turnover in gas station ownership is one of the many images of a changing New York. While the new immigrants come from a vast spectrum of countries, with a heavy emphasis on Asian, South American and Caribbean nations, and work in a variety of jobs, they have also developed their own specialized niches, virtually monopolizing certain businesses or professions and slowly changing the commercial, political and cultural profile of the city. The forces that draw immigrant groups to certain occupations and businesses -- Indians to gas stations, Koreans and Dominicans to grocery stores and Afghans to fried chicken places -- are complex and varied. Their occupational choices are based on factors like skills and values learned in the old country, the paths followed by fellow immigrants who preceded them, or merely a lack of more attractive economic options. Sociologists agree that there is no universal pattern to these ethnic niches and that often labor specialization is random and hinges on availability of positions in certain localities. Indians, for example, may be preeminent in gas stations in New York, but in Los Angeles those business are dominated by a Korean quasi-monopoly. But once a niche is found, it creates a snowball effect, gathering in labor from that ethnic group and expanding exponentially. The common thread linking all immigrant work niches is the insider's edge on the profession. Ethnic labor, in particular family labor, is cheap and easily exploited and there is no linguistic, cultural or discriminatory barrier. Many immigrants are self-employed entrepreneurs. More than 85 percent of the 1, green grocer stores in the metropolitan area are owned and run by Koreans, sociologists say. The more than , Koreans who have come to New York also own novelty shops, beauty salons, liquor stores and dry cleaning. Indians and Pakistanis -- close to 95, of whom reside in the city -- have a virtual monopoly on newsstands. Since the mid's, they have been buying into gas stations, and their growing presence in the jewelry trade has made them the second largest ethnic group -- after Hasidic Jews -- in the Diamond District. Guyanese -- the fourth largest immigrant group -- can be found throughout the city's pharmacies and machinery repair shops. They also stand out, along with the Jamaicans and Irish, in the child-care business. Even the smallest of immigrant groups, like the Afghans and the Senegalese, have carved out their own niches. There are fewer than 4, Afghans in the city -- almost all war refugees -- yet they own more than fast-food chicken restaurants, Afghan businessmen say, in particular a non-franchised chain of more than 40 called Kennedy's Fried Chicken. The Senegalese, many of them already traders by profession, came to the United States via Europe and have prospered hawking a variety of wares on street corners throughout the city. Korean Success: Toil and Innovation. One of the the most visible successes has been the Koreans. An estimated , Koreans have come to the metropolitan area since the 's and 65 percent of Korean families own at least one business, said Pyong Gap Min, a professor of sociology at Queens College, who is a specialist on Koreans in the United States..

I'll stop now, but my church claim was only that the medieval church had a hand in changing the culture, in places which are now mostly protestant or atheist. The places which the post-reformation catholic church has thrived are indeed pretty different. The dogma of Catholicism did not destroy the clan structure in Europe, though it was certainly used by those Why do indians own gas stations did.

It was the humans running the church, who Why do indians own gas stations particular political objectives relevant to the time and place which are not necessarily anything like the political objectives of the people involved with the church these days. No one here is making the argument that Catholicism cannot exist alongside close extended families, so your objection to the argument that is being made falls completely flat. I'm struggling to think of a good source right now, sorry. But a link I've posted before looking the other way, at how the other half of the Roman empire turned out: I think of the nuclear family more as an invention of 20th century ad campaigns.

Many people thought this, e. But it's not true, we have data.

An Ethnic Road to Riches: The Immigrant Job Specialty

Oh please Indian Why do indians own gas stations families still act in extended structures. I mean, three of my uncles Why do indians own gas stations priests and one is a bishop. We've been Christian for thousands of years. We're still part of an overbearing, very close, very extended Indian family. The Click to see more of European culture can be traced solely back to issues in European culture.

Let's more info blaming the church for things that Europe brought upon itself. To be clear, my claim above is that the church, as a centralising power structure in "christaindom" circa AD, played some role in pushing the culture there towards openness, or in making extended families less important.

Claiming that christianity always and everywhere does this would be pretty obviously wrong, and I did not say this. And indeed even within europe today, catholic-ness is anti-correlated with this kind of "openness" -- because the core relevant for this has long since gone protestant or atheist.

I hold this claim weakly. There are other arguments for what happened. And that both ends have advantages, depending on the situation.

But still this doesn't make sense, as Latin America was converted in the s, well after the AD change that you claim occurred. Latin America, despite having years for Catholicism to settle in, is still really big into the extended family. I think a better explanation is the Protestant reformation weakened the idea that any person should subjugate their own personal individual desires for the greater good, with its emphasis on an individual quest for truth, an idea which has now permeated here culture.

This makes sense with what I've experienced of non-European Catholicism, which mostly just finds Protestantism bizzare and confusing. The people running the catholic church around AD were not running the catholic church in Latin America Why do indians own gas stations AD.

And our families are, cross-culturally, unusually small. I talk to my parents every few weeks. Not so much my aunts and uncles. I have a few cousins who I see every fifth Christmas or so, and anyone more distant than that may as well be unrelated.

This seems to be common within American culture, but it leads to weak social networks - unless you go to the right college and can network there. I think dispersion plays into Why do indians own gas stations. It's a lot harder to stay in touch at a distance. I guess given social Why do indians own gas stations you might say it's easier to stay in touch when close.

Generally my American friends and family never ask for money to fund good ideas. The people asking for money are people who are asking me to throw money at things that won't produce more money i. My friend Why do indians own gas stations his wife just had one of their cars stop working and they both need cars to make money.

They are in debt and need to work. There's no way my friend will ask, but I will probably find a way to help them. My niece has no problem hitting up my parents for money for her latest crazy investment scheme after demonstrating several poor choices and a lack of business and financial judgement.

I agree with the individualist streak, but the second part is pretty much untrue of anyone I've met in the upper plain states. Helping to bootstrap you friends and family is part of the culture. MisterTea 7 months ago. I think the true killer app is family cooperation as a unit in conjunction with a deep network of relatives. My father built his business with the help of his parents, his aunt, and two other cousins who lent him money.

Without their help, he couldn't have built the business as fast and as big as he did. His brother also worked for him a bit as well as some of the cousins when he was building his first shop.

My mother helped him and once she had me and my brother stayed at home and took care fo the home front even though she had a masters degree. And it appears his generation along with my mothers was the last hurrah of big family ties and help as everyone in my generation up and left. I have no cousins, uncles or aunts who are close.

They all did their own thing, went to school and moved away. I see them from time to time, maybe once or twice a year and that's it.

Hell, even my mother has all sorts of stories about how here massive Irish family grandma was one of 12 kids pulled together to help each other with everything. Contrast that with my Guyanese friend who has a seemingly never ending supply of helpful family members all in the same neighborhood.

His father built himself a small real estate empire of about a dozen rental properties and most of his generation are college educated.

His father started out doing handyman and light construction work with his brothers. They all chipped in and worked. Some https://romantic.katcr.press/page8546-xet.php had a day job and came to the properties at night to Why do indians own gas stations on them.

One by one they fixed and flipped homes using money and labor they pooled together. Then Why do indians own gas stations started buying, fixing and renting. They acted as a small family army, cooperatively building each others future. The American family has been here long enough to thin and die whereas these foreign families are still "fresh" to America and working hard to make a good life.

But they too will one day suffer the same fate.

Why do indians own gas stations

Subsequent generations won't have to work as hard as they are already comfortable. Little by little they will spread out, move away, and their once mighty army is no more.

From my perspective as a true 3rd gen American all G-Grandparents came from Europe around the same time is that by the third generation, there are no more cultural roots. And family is culture so family dissolves as well. My mother and father were the last to really care and my father was very meh about his Polish heritage. My mother was adamant, keeping traditions alive for as long as possible but the local family thinned out as the rest moved away. She is probably the last to really care about family and cultural roots which bound the early immigrants, and their children.

Why do indians own gas stations are good reasons that many people avoid Why do indians own gas stations money to or even doing business with close friends and relatives. If the venture doesn't succeed, and the friend is unable to repay the loan, it can create animosity and bitterness that wreck the relationship.

Even if things go well, it can create an uncomfortable power dynamic that makes the relationship less pleasant and friendly.

Why do indians own gas stations

I grew up in a community that was just coming out of this phase the combined Israeli and Persian Jewish communities of Why do indians own gas stations. I think you're interpreting "relations" in a way too close to the Why do indians own gas stations of the relatively atomized White American society. Informal immigrant Why do indians own gas stations networks are generally wider than "close friends and relatives" - they extend Why do indians own gas stations distant cousins and friends-of-friends.

For a concrete example of how this works in the Middle Eastern Jewish community, and historically in the Ashkenazi immigrant Jewish community: The act of the here is a one-time intervention and said interaction is teen sex photo closed out with a direct thanks or a gift or both, rather than being an ongoing professional relationship.

If the venture doesn't succeed you'll have an awkward relationship with the two-hops-removed acquaintance, and the one-hop-removed intermediary will know about it and be less likely to recommend you to others for credit, but real social consequences that extend to direct friends and relatives are reserved for those who are considered to have acted maliciously or irresponsibly e.

Search for "credit" in this article on immigrant enclaves for some examples of communities with these kinds of social structures: I also think a middle-class family is in the "sweet spot" where they have a lot to lose from offering a loan as opposed to either not having a lot to lose in the first place or being so well-off that they can easily just write off a bad investment.

StillBored 7 months ago. Big cities, rural areas, even in backwoods hick places, you name it. We do indeed live in a capitalistic society, but it just seems like exclusion.

It's also interesting the way they take over a big name gas station like BP or Texaco They'll change the name but keep the colors and logos to trick people.

Last edited read article Tarik One: I love it when people complain about immigrants making a better life for themselves. Last edited by Knuck the Ficks: They all got family or close friends in the business so it just kinda spreads.

Why do indians own gas stations stations can be lucrative. I've found it's actually been happening less and less, at least where I'm at. Most corporate gas stations your Shells, Gulfs, Mobils, etc can afford to price their gas at lower prices due to the sheer volume they sell. I know family friends I'm middle eastern that had to get out of the business because they couldn't stay competitive with their pricing, so nobody would go there.

If this is the case everywhere, hope to see it end quick. Indians' potential Ceiling - Doctors, cardiologists, hospitalists, etc Bottom-feeding - running gas stations Say what you want, they eating good no matter where they're at. All times are GMT Asians would look Why do indians own gas stations to say a b2b web design business because they can t see the tangiable assets of the business. If you are a basketball playerthen your straight leap is important but if you do have this problem you do not need certainly to fear because the solution is here now https: With Vert Shock program you'll gain 9 to 15 inches to your straight leap in only 8 week.

This program is structured in 3 stages. And, ultimately, there's the Post-Shock period, that is simply for sealing in your newly obtained gains and creating parts of your muscles used to the quickly neurological response. Basic and simple Vert Shock Why do indians own gas stations the job performed! For the best answers, search on this site https: However, you are making some strong generalizations.

Eastern Indians are involved in many businesses, not just gas stations. As well, the owners of gas stations are distributed across our nation Why do indians own gas stations a greater number of these businesses clustered around highly populated areas. There are many Indians involved see more technological production. Bose sound systems is owned by Eastern Indians.

Many Internet providers are owned and managed by Eastern Indians.

Sexdate assen Watch Video Pak Pornxxy. Find More Posts by Knuck the Ficks. Apr Location: I walk the earth Kung Fu style Posts: Join Date: Jul Location: Find More Posts by emsteez forreal. ATL Posts: I have heard some Dooms-like theories regarding this. Find More Posts by phoenix Jan Posts: Find More Posts by Akrazotile. Dec Posts: Find More Posts by DukeDelonte Providence, RI Posts: Find More Posts by code green. Aug Location: This program is structured in 3 stages. And, ultimately, there's the Post-Shock period, that is simply for sealing in your newly obtained gains and creating parts of your muscles used to the quickly neurological response. Basic and simple Vert Shock gets the job performed! For the best answers, search on this site https: However, you are making some strong generalizations. Eastern Indians are involved in many businesses, not just gas stations. As well, the owners of gas stations are distributed across our nation with a greater number of these businesses clustered around highly populated areas. There are many Indians involved in technological production. Bose sound systems is owned by Eastern Indians. Many Internet providers are owned and managed by Eastern Indians. They participate in companies that manage stock portfolios, as well as Asians. A lot of nail salons are owned by blacks, and other cultures. These salons are not dominated by Asian ownership. Blacks are active participants and owners of many manufacturing companies. One of the largest distribute rs of used automobile parts is owned by a black owner. It is a multi million dollar business, has no debt, and I have stock in this company. So, my suggestion is for you to seek confirmation of your generalizations. You will learn a lot. Statistics eg. Most of what you say is only true in the US. In China, Asians work at Gas Stations, Nail places, and play basketball and football not baseball - but that's the national sport in Japan, so plenty of Asians play it there. Golf is expensive, so only wealthy people get to play it very often. So, in the US, it's mostly to do with history and how it effected statistics. Those business people and golfers you're talking about grew up in wealthy families - and because of history white people are still wealthier than black people in the US but in various countries in Africa and the Middle East, black people run all the businesses and play golf and cricket. The labor costs are an issue. I cooked a curry with garden vegetables and Gulf shrimp over the weekend, and it took over an hour perhaps it would have been unpalatable to a real Indian person, but three hillbillies from the Ozarks liked it just fine. However, it's possible to purchase e. But yeah restaurants are difficult. Way too much competition in that space unless you really like running a restaurant. Chinese-Americans seem to have had some success, however. For home cooking, pressure cooking makes Indian meals much easier. In a restaurant you'd presumably make big batches. Pressure cookers make lots of stuff easier! They don't chop up vegetables though Maybe saffron, but it's used very sparingly in only a few dishes, and a little goes a long way. Generally, vegetables are more expensive than grains and more perishable. By mass, Indian food is mostly grains and pulses Rice, wheat, and split peas. You should try Rajdhani in Artesia, CA if you get a chance. But that's the only one I have found. Or Shahnawaz, not too far away. For the time I spent in India, most of them eat their meals at street stalls throughout the day. Those that do have home cooked meals, often have housemaids that do all of that super labor intensive cooking. Even the relatively poor, have even poorer people working below them at home! Good Indian food doesn't exist in the US. This is incredibly diminutive of Indian cuisine in America. I'm sorry Michelin star means squat for Indian food. I have tried both and they are pretty crappy. Ah yes, Indian cuisine like "Bombay Sliders. Dude I've lived in Singapore. You don't have to tell me about food. Hopefully you made it to Penang then. While I am in agreement that BC has plenty of authentic south asian cuisine, Seattle is not so terrible. Food recommendation: The cuisine is way older than the partition What is good in Seattle? Everything good is actually within a km radius of Microsoft HQ in Redmond, on the east side. There's a really good chaat place. Mayuri the grocery store does have a great selection of staples items. Naan and Curry has the best non-vegetarian South-Asian food in the Seattle area. It has branches in Renton and Issaquah. I have personally found it much better than Maza grill, mentioned in the other comment. I got 2 greeting cards from the franchise in 1 year. JohnJamesRambo 7 months ago. Can someone tell me why the surname of Patel is so predominant in the hotel owners? The article doesn't really explain why. We are from Indian state Gujarat. Patel is the most common last name in Gujarat. Sister A applied for the immigration visa for my dad's sister-in-law. My dad's sister-in-law and my dad's brother immigrated to the USA in the late 70s. They only have limited options for the job. So they work their butt off for a few years and buy a small motel. Fellow Gujju here. It is "one" of the most common last names in Gujarat. Probably it might be the most common last name of Gujjus outside Gujarat but I doubt it is so inside the state. The Gujaratis are known to be big on business as the bread and butter of life. Even the simplest of businesses is something they would rather pick up than learn an actual trade. Of the Gujaratis, the Patel's are known for being the biggest pursuers of business. Aside from being a common name, Patel is synonymous to owning a business. One of the ways that Gujaratis come to America is use the investments route, sort of like investment chain migration. One member takes an investment, migrates, sets up business, profits, then sends the money back home, for others to travel in the same visa program. Then two people come, twice the profit, twice the pace of bringing people over. These business groups form around family bonds typically. In India, last names were usually based on your occupation. And iirc, Patels used to be farmers or merchants. It's the most common Gujarati surname. That's why you would see some people having "Motiwala" as a last name which literally translates to "Pearl merchant". Patel here, Patel as a community has farming background, and usually are quite industrious people, and so are generally in the middle or upper middle class in India also. Most who are coming to USA already have good amount of money or somehow have access to it, but they do not have first world skill for high tech job or business, so for doing business, this is the only option, or grocery store or petrol pumps. This kind of financing not available to outsiders, and that kind of community effects are every where to be seen in many industries. For example, there was an article about how Portuguese immigrants have sort of dominated Dunkin franchises. Common Gujarati lastname 2. Good old fashioned nepotism. Patel is a common surname in one portion of India. The article misses several important points why the Gujariti could take over the whole south and west in all cheap hotels. The main reason is a special Visa execption, very similar to the Chinese cook visa exception. Family members can easily come over and work there. So they can undercut all costs in running a hotel, esp. The big chains saw this advantage and put a Gujariti manager everywhere. They replaced room cleaning step by step and are also doing the small repairs by themselves. They have a strong community to help each other out. Biggest problem is room cleaning though. It's a different experience, it smells. Who knows what kind of chemicals they use. For sure the wrong ones. So what else is new? How come every other cop - especially in the North east - is named Dennehy or O'Reilly; every other landscaping firm is owned by people with surnames like Caruso or Zanatta; every other construction firm in California esp. Ethnic professions are nothing new, and part and parcel of American immigrant history. Just another chapter My understanding is that immigrants often have a high rate of entrepreneurship. It's always nice to hear about people coming to the US and not just taking a chance coming to the US, but also taking advantage of those freedoms to take the risk of starting a business and the massive amount of work that it takes to do so. The environment back home is so fu d up, that , whole family working 12 hours a day seems like real stress reliever. My uncle who went USA and doing the motel thing, used to have business in India. While it's certainly true that people from Gujarat are business minded, I have observed that they are equally narrow minded, especially when it comes to selecting whom they work with and they almost always select a fellow Gujarati. I have personal experience with this, I had a Gujarati classmate and we had plans for starting up after our college, he later went on to work for his brother in law who you already guessed it worked in the hospitality industry , he only told me later when I asked that he was pressured by his family to work with them exclusively. You may think that this is a one off example, but it's not, nearly all people I came across had similar mindset. Also they contributed largely to the election of Modi as a PM in India, who is also drumroll a Gujarati, now this may be good or bad depending on how you look at it. After living in western countries for well over 50 years calling themselves American, Canadian and British etc , they ooze pride about their entrepreneurial heritage; but they still vote and contribute money towards electing a man whose past screams bloody murder and that is plain hypocrisy! Ramesh 7 months ago. Most Gujus do not stay in Gujarat, they are business people buying and selling only no production. RickJWagner 7 months ago. I love stories where hard work pays off. Hats off to this family. JoeAltmaier 7 months ago. Anybody have any real statistics on this? I have a datapoint. His surname was Patel. That is, things work by convention, affiliation and duty. They don't work through formal agreements, roles and contracts. Family is a true economic unit, with productive capacity, credit potential and such. Affiliations with other families are important. Its not necessarily worse than a Banks's. Gujarati here. Our success in Motel and Gas Station industry can be attributed to the following. The same model then also can be seen in tech industry. I have explained below: There is no two factor auth each time you do a credit card transaction, you can do self checkouts at Walmart etc. Many of first world citizens might take this for granted but these factors give a huge boost to economy. There are more transactions and less wealth is destroyed just to enforce a contract. We Gujjus take this to the next level in USA. Consider John Smith decides to run a gas station. Not to mention these attendants steal cash and other stuff from the gas station store often too. Jose steals his cash one day and is never seen again or is caught by ICE and deported. Now Dhirubhai Patel buys the same gas station. He makes a phone call and finds another Gujju student who is currently on F1 and legally can not earn and is paying heavy rent in bay area. He agrees to man his gas station at night and sleep in there too. He saves on rent and takes literally no salary until he completes his masters. Also the gujju students is much less prone to stealing and cheating and on other hand is more thankful to Dhirubhai. After completing his masters this kid joins a reputed tech company and later employs Dhirubhai's daughter as an intern. Everyone wins. I see a lot of hate for Indian tech workers among white nativists tech workers on apps like Team Blind and also on twitter search for HR on twitter. They correctly point out that Indians have been succeeding at a much greater rate than natives. They claim that Indian managers tend to hire Indian employees even in top firms like Google etc. That might be true as Indians quickly build trust among each other. It is common for a new H1B from India to work for a startup at least for years just because founders helped him come to USA even though salary is lower I did this. Both my founders were Indians and the company was successfully acquired. I left within 6 months of acquisition to join one of the FANGs. I think the lack of proper deterministic path to green card actually forces smaller ethnic groups to huddle together instead of being more individualistic. This in some way prevents assimilation. There are over K tech H1Bs who are here for decade or more and yet wont get their green cards. Same goes for motels, farming, gas stations and many other businesses which are being completely cornered by Indian-Americans. Every ethnic immigrant group huddles together, regardless of visa status. That is basic human nature. Just to clear any confusion I am not saying the success comes at the expense of breaking the law. In some cases it is true but at fundamental level it is about "establishing trust". You can break a lot of victim-less laws and get away with it when you can establish trust. Most often these are minimum wage laws and immigration laws both of which in my opinion some of the worst laws in the world. As a second generation patel I can say entrepreneurship runs in our blood. Although my dad's hotel did not work out, I've never had a full time job with benefits and I've spent 11 years trying to build iorad. Cool app idea. Story of my life. CodeSheikh 7 months ago. Is the author generalizing other South Asian immigrants as Indian Americans? I am not cleared about this just from reading the article alone. They are mostly from one region of India. Not only loan, but a continuous strong investment from exporters from India who do not move that money back to India. Just like Apple or other tech giants are doing. I have to wonder if any Gujarati non-Patel Muslims turned up, would they be getting the same handshake loans? Gujarat is a state in India, where there are a hundred million people or more. A specific tribe of people that happen to have mainly come from Gujarat gave handshake loans to each other, because they are part of the same tribe, and know each other, indirectly or directly. Why would they give handshake loans to just anybody, regardless of their religion or where they came from? Non-Patel Hindus that are of the same caste as Patels would have a hard time getting Handshake loans. It is really tribal. Within Patels themselves, there are extensive intra-Patel clans. I know, but I mean there are Muslim Patels too, is what I was driving at. Especially since in the old days tribes were frequently family oriented and religion was a big part of family. But tribes keep changing. When everyone was immigrating and desperate, they acted as one and helped each other. Now, the successful ones and 2nd generations americans who can stand on their own have become their own tribe. Now there are new tribes, mostly split along socioeconomic and education lines, regardless of religion. They would not be part of the clan back in India, and would not be part of the clan here. VectorLock 7 months ago. I think it safe to say they mean "Indian American" in a racial rather than national context, akin to "African American". So I'd take it to include people who have ethnic ties to the entire Indian subcontinent, including Pakistan and Bangladesh. As a Canadian who has lived many years in the US, the casual use of racial descriptors still shocks me. I find is very discomforting to be asked my race on forms, to see national news talk about how different ethnic groups feel about this or that. No, they explicitly mean Indian, even more specifically Gujarati Indians. Indians don't have their own census category now, either. On your latter point, absolutely. And the people who make make the biggest effort to categorize people into hyphenated-Americans are the very ones who turn around and accuse people of being some-kinda-phobic or some-sorta-ist if they don't see the world that way. IOW, the hard work of generations prior, with "compounded interest" of the hard work of each generation since. This is definitely worth reading. This short and simple article has lots of lessons. Hacker News new past comments ask show jobs submit. Motels nationalgeographic. Mikeb85 7 months ago Can't say criminals aren't enterprising. AlexCoventry 7 months ago He would have tipped his hand as a purveyor of speculative, just-so, white-supremacist garbage, if he'd cited her. AlexCoventry 7 months ago Dude, I've written papers on population genetics. IkmoIkmo 7 months ago Might be different in the US, in Europe it's not too uncommon to talk about calvinists, particularly in certain countries like the Netherlands it's a well-established term which is even used there to describe Dutch behavioral culture, because it's deemed to be so fitting , and separate from other forms of protestantism. Spooky23 7 months ago Americans want less risk, and fiscal policy drives consolidation. Shivetya 7 months ago I would have put it more at not about lending them money but the strong desire to strike out on their own. Timmah 7 months ago Another important difference is the free-labor-from-your-kids benefit. AdamM12 7 months ago Worked in restaurant industry. AdamM12 7 months ago Yeah I can imagine. AdamM12 7 months ago Awesome didn't know what the formal name was. The common thread linking all immigrant work niches is the insider's edge on the profession. Ethnic labor, in particular family labor, is cheap and easily exploited and there is no linguistic, cultural or discriminatory barrier. Many immigrants are self-employed entrepreneurs. More than 85 percent of the 1, green grocer stores in the metropolitan area are owned and run by Koreans, sociologists say. The more than , Koreans who have come to New York also own novelty shops, beauty salons, liquor stores and dry cleaning. Indians and Pakistanis -- close to 95, of whom reside in the city -- have a virtual monopoly on newsstands. Since the mid's, they have been buying into gas stations, and their growing presence in the jewelry trade has made them the second largest ethnic group -- after Hasidic Jews -- in the Diamond District. Guyanese -- the fourth largest immigrant group -- can be found throughout the city's pharmacies and machinery repair shops. They also stand out, along with the Jamaicans and Irish, in the child-care business. Even the smallest of immigrant groups, like the Afghans and the Senegalese, have carved out their own niches. There are fewer than 4, Afghans in the city -- almost all war refugees -- yet they own more than fast-food chicken restaurants, Afghan businessmen say, in particular a non-franchised chain of more than 40 called Kennedy's Fried Chicken. The Senegalese, many of them already traders by profession, came to the United States via Europe and have prospered hawking a variety of wares on street corners throughout the city. Korean Success: Toil and Innovation. One of the the most visible successes has been the Koreans. An estimated , Koreans have come to the metropolitan area since the 's and 65 percent of Korean families own at least one business, said Pyong Gap Min, a professor of sociology at Queens College, who is a specialist on Koreans in the United States. Few Korean green grocers owned such stores in their homeland. But they arrived in the United States at a propitious time, when many Greeks, Italians and Jews were leaving the grocery business. Most were highly educated professionals with limited English skills and no business experience. But they had money to invest. The grocery stores were attractive because, although they required long, hard hours, they could be run with only basic shards of English. In the United States, they revamped and spruced up the stores, filling the demand for items beyond the basics of the old grocery store. New immigrants learned the business from fellow Koreans before they invested in their own stores. Although Koreans in New York City were already firmly entrenched in the trade of Korean products, green grocers were their first businesses not tied to the products of their homeland, Professor Min said. The snowballing success of Korean grocers is due in part to an extensive and well-organized support system. New arrivals can rely on a page Korean business directory, as well as dozens of business groups, including the Korean Green Grocer Association. When black residents of Flatbush, Brooklyn, organized a boycott of two Korean grocers in , for instance, fellow Korean grocers put up money to help the stores remain in business. In the last several years, as a visible testimony to the phenomenon of ethnic succession, Koreans have begun hiring Central Americans and Mexicans to perform the menial tasks in their stores. Anderson Han, 41, has owned his green grocery on the corner of Union Street and 41st Avenue in Flushing for three-and-a-half years. His story reflects the successes of many Korean immigrants. View all New York Times newsletters..

They participate in companies that manage stock portfolios, as well as Asians. A lot of nail salons are owned by blacks, and other cultures.

These salons are not dominated by Asian ownership. Blacks are active participants and owners of many manufacturing companies.

Rotterdam sex Watch Video Bobbs pussy. This is the basis of "chit funds" https: Similar schemes also apparently exist in countries like S Korea per my Korean neighbor. But in the motel instances outlined here, anecdotally, lending circles are not used. It's typically a small group of family members or very close friends with a pool of money to "lend". Yes, having family members work for you for free is legal. My accountant once encouraged me to try to get my family members involved in a business I ran just for that reason. I think the question of age comes into play though. But there are an awful lot of very young family members working on commercial farms. This was on a farm. As an adult, it seems that anything kids might do around the house, they might do in a family-owned motel. If there are laws against that they are bad laws and also inconsistently enforced. There's a family business exception. Underaged labor is legal in the USA as long as they are employed by their parents and the work isn't in manufacturing, mining or occupations declared hazardous. You could make the argument that startup founders who aren't taking a salary from their early stage startup are also performing "free, illegally so" labor. I think in that case, you can't work for yourself illegally. HeyLaughingBoy 7 months ago. If the startup is incorporated, then you're working for the corporation, not for "yourself. The original blockchain: There's an interesting ancient pattern of small minority groups dominating certain businesses, often ones which need trust -- here "handshake loans", but traditionally also simply payment for goods shipped long-distances. The Greek trader in one little Egyptian town could be more confident in dealing with another Greek trader somewhere in Italy, a week's sail away, because while he might be tempted to run off with the money, word would get around, and soon no other Greek would trust the guy, nobody would marry his sons This mechanism didn't work for people from the majority community, because they weren't so specialised, could do other business, could find another priest Thus the Greeks could ship things cheaper, and won the business. The Patels, and related Gujarati groups, have been in this kind of trust-heavy long-distance trade for centuries. They spread all over East Africa in the 19th C, and did very well. It's sort of common knowledge in India that Gujaratis, Sindhis, Punjabis and Malayalis Keralites are generally pretty enterprising and are often businessmen, both within India and abroad. There can be other such Indian communities too, of course. These are just the ones I have heard of from childhood as tending to be more so. Again, I don't mean to rule out other places where these or other Indians could have gone, these are just the ones I am more familiar with, and may have relatively high concentrations. Be interesting to know if there are other places where particular groups have gone and done well. Of course, lots of Indians went to Fiji and Malaysia too, I've read, although those may have mostly gone as plantation labor initially and some to Trinidad and Tobago, Guyana, etc. Don't know how those are doing now. I guess it is both because they use some different local Malaysian ingredients, and because of the long time of separation from India must have made their cuisine evolved to be somewhat different. It was interesting stuff, though. Yes indeed, they specialise within India too. And surely some of the same network benefits may apply there too. Surely Parsi entrepreneurs a century ago got better loans It's also my hazy impression that the plantation-labor Indian groups haven't done nearly as well on the whole. Another example is the surprisingly high proportion of overseas Chinese who are from Fujian. Could be. I do know that Parsis are said to take care of the elderly and poor of their community. They have retirement homes and do charity for them, etc. They are generally philantropic too, like some others. Good of them. I recently learned about oulipo https: Lack of resources can be sometimes a blessing in disguise whether it is literature or hard business. I wonder why Americans don't do this maybe they do, I don't know - why borrow from banks or VCs etc with strict strings attached, instead of supporting one another based on trust? There has been a long term decline of community banks, which might be the more American equivalent of this kind of lending. The Small Business Administration also helps with loan guarantees. So the support is sort of there, but takes a different form, and maybe one could say the impersonal nature of it is both a strength and a weakness in comparison. Numbers of small businesses and their starts have been in decline too. I suspect this has to do with the difficulty of more and more Americans in attaining any savings from their wages let alone enough to set aside to help capitalize a small business. I suspect this has to do with the difficulty of more and more Americans in attaining any savings from their wages All the more important to support one another. Although, if everyone in a person's trust circle is more or less in the same boat, then tough luck: Some non profits are working in this space too. After Sandy, some orgs in NY were giving interest free loans to small biz people who lost their trucks etc. Americans are forced by law and convention into living a very specific kind of life. Lots of things they do and "own" require substantial investment of money and time. A regular not minimum wage is calibrated to just barely take care of all that, and modern marketing specializes in "educating" our tastes so that we can really tell the difference between e. Although on average they are poorer, residents of India have a great deal more freedom with respect to the costs of everyday life. No matter how basic their housing, transport, clothing, food, education, safety, etc. Many lives lived happily in India would be largely illegal in USA. I think it's counter-intuitive but in a high trust society you don't have a need to build these networks. In a low-trust society like India you have to build trust networks. When you take these trust networks over to a high-trust society, they just act as additional leverage in your life. I know Indian guys who lent each other large five figure sums to help business deals go along and, the most surprising to me, had one take on a mortgage for another in Menlo Park! The family it was for was a dual income software engineer family, just missing a credit history and starting capital. Because there is a general lack of trust of people outside one's immediate family and a usually very small circle of friends. Family members are pretty much exempt from labor laws. Hence the cost structure can be a lot lower by using family labor. Most restaurants in Europe are run by immigrant families, they couldn't turn a profit otherwise. Could this apply, or have applied, to farms? I bet that would have a lot of interesting social effects. In my area it already does. I thought that was wonderful--I'm a fan of frugality. I'm curious if this is common in the US in other immigrant communities. My dad's friend is an Indian farmer in Valdosta, GA. He has 10k acres of land, has his own private plane and flies Indian groceries to Houston once a week. He immigrated to the US back in the 60's. I had a chance to meet him and he had an extraordinary character. He had no formalities and greeted us at his farm house without a shirt on. He was old but fit and you can tell what he has gone through in his life to make a living. He spoke fluent spanish and everyone loved him in Valdosta. We spent 3 days there and went to restaurants in the evening. Everyone greeted him as if he was some kind of a hero in the town. It was really an amazing experience to have met him and his family - just shows how immigrants assimilate in the most remote places in the US, especially in a hostile place such as south Georgia in the 60's. This story is from Wow, cool story. I wonder under what visa or work permit scheme he went there. I had two uncles and an aunt who went to the US and stayed there, but they all went via the traditional grad student then H1-B then green card then citizen route, and were all white collar workers an engineer turned entrepreneur and two academics , not farmers. Didn't know there were schemes for farmers and such, then or now, for the US, although I think there might be for Canada. At least in the late 70's - early 80's, if you could find an employer to "sponsor" you basically agree to give you a job for a certain amount of time , then you could immigrate with a green card immediately. There was no specific "scheme" for particular occupations: I'd assume something similar was already in place during the 60's. Interesting, thanks. Yes absolutely. As an Indian American, I'm familiar with the Indian grocery store model. However, I grew up in a majority vietnamese area of Southern California, and most of my friends growing up were vietnamese. They had a few interesting hustles going on: A few families were involved in growing produce in their backyards, and grocery stores would source these fruits. Many of the fruits certainly not all popular in Vietnam would grow in the heat of SoCal, but they were not farmed commercially. My mom's friend told her that many vietnamese restaurants sourced their egg rolls from various aunties scattered around the community. The egg roll they made was very standardized, and they would sell many trays a day to the restaurants for cents on the dollar. Under the table? I think it would be very difficult to bring Vietnamese flora into the USA through legitimate channels. The fruit I was talking about is dragon fruit: Hotels work because they require capital and low overhead — they also have a limited scope of competition. Small farmers are being starved out and losing access to capital as small banks go away. The big players in the agriculture business are global now, and a farmer in Ohio or New York will have a hard time making money, as the big companies just need to outbid you for one harvest season, and make up the difference with their weekly harvests in California, Chile, etc. There are players people serving Chinese restaurants and the Amish doing well, but those markets are limited. The model doesn't work in commodity ag, but no model really works for that in the long term. It always takes more capital. Farms have been failing or "consolidating", if you prefer for years. The bogeyman didn't shutter those banks. The nonviability of buying a bigger combine and renting more land every couple of years shuttered those banks. Such a bank could have stayed open if at least once every few years its county was the only one in the Great Plains to get rain. That would have been a lucky bank I'm not sure what will disrupt commodity ag, but it sucks, and the sooner it transforms into something else the better. The most successful farmers I know now are raising goats for halal butchers. I'm going to start crossing my cattle with "wagyu" bulls. Don't sell commodities. Could you elaborate on your question? It is the exact same with convenience stores. Work hour days. Only have other family members work there. CodeCube 7 months ago. If you are interested in these kinds of stories, check out the documentary http: Just recommended this film today to someone! Definitely worth checking out, even outside your interest of what General Tso actually is. I find this interesting, because my family used to take road trips all the time annually in the '90s, less often since then , and we mostly stayed in motels that were part of national chains like Hampton Inn, La Quinta, Holiday Inn Express, Fairfield by Marriott, Best Western, etc. I guess the owners could have been, but that would mean they're hiring people outside of family. I'm wondering if this article applies to just independent motels or if it also includes franchises of the national chains at least, I assume the national chains use a franchise model. I'd be honestly surprised if independent motels were a full half of the number of motels in the US, since the chains are everywhere. DhirubhaiPatel 7 months ago. The anti-asian immigration laws were repealed only in [1] only to benefit Poles and Italians but then also ended up benefiting Indians and Chinese. Many of them came to USA during that time and toiled mostly in menial jobs. It was only around late 80s that they had gathered enough influence to buy motels and such and this motel takeover was much more visible during early s. In the Obama era recession the property prices dropped further and many Indians purchased even more motels. Also the Patel community is not really into high end motels like Hampton Inn. They are into Motel 6, Super 8, Choice Hotels, etc. In fact, most of the franchise owner's staff is non-Indian. Also, most of the money you can make is by not hiring outside help. On the same note, I recently watched this video covering how Cambodian immigrants ended up running so many donuts shops, especially here in SoCal: And Tippi Hedren bringing Vietnamese refugees into the nail salon business. I became aware of the Gujarati hospitality empire some decades ago, when my work involved community organizing in the rural US. I was finding that just about all the old motels on state highways were run by Gujaratis. And when I'd become a regular, some would share about their experience. And would invite my friends and me for dinner, which was heaven. Especially given that the alternatives were typically burgers, steaks or fried chicken. This book provides the investment philosophy behind the Patel success and how it can apply in other realms. The Dhandho Investor: I look forward to the next National Geographic article in this series where they document in detail how American Jews came to run a substantial proportion of U. I need to put this more judiciously: I am from gujarat, do not own any motel. In my experience I can definitely believe this to be true. Personally know so many people heho owns motels. No one who travels and stays in small-to-medium-sized hotels is shocked by this. I have a complaint, however. We have so many Indian-Americans distributed all over the nation, and it is still fairly difficult to find good Indian food outside big cities. I've wondered about this, but what I've heard is that few Indian families eat out very often. Indian food is labor intensive and uses expensive ingredients. Restaurants are also low margin businesses that don't scale well and are super risky, not something I'd advise someone to do unless they have a passion for it and ability to fail and carry on with life. I have not been to a single Indian restaurant that can compare to a home cooked Gujarati meal, especially made by someone who grew up there. I'd be thrilled if there were some restaurants that passed a much lower bar than that. I don't agree about expensive ingredients. Lots of restaurants not all! The labor costs are an issue. I cooked a curry with garden vegetables and Gulf shrimp over the weekend, and it took over an hour perhaps it would have been unpalatable to a real Indian person, but three hillbillies from the Ozarks liked it just fine. However, it's possible to purchase e. But yeah restaurants are difficult. Way too much competition in that space unless you really like running a restaurant. Chinese-Americans seem to have had some success, however. For home cooking, pressure cooking makes Indian meals much easier. In a restaurant you'd presumably make big batches. Pressure cookers make lots of stuff easier! They don't chop up vegetables though Maybe saffron, but it's used very sparingly in only a few dishes, and a little goes a long way. Generally, vegetables are more expensive than grains and more perishable. By mass, Indian food is mostly grains and pulses Rice, wheat, and split peas. You should try Rajdhani in Artesia, CA if you get a chance. But that's the only one I have found. Or Shahnawaz, not too far away. For the time I spent in India, most of them eat their meals at street stalls throughout the day. Those that do have home cooked meals, often have housemaids that do all of that super labor intensive cooking. Even the relatively poor, have even poorer people working below them at home! Good Indian food doesn't exist in the US. This is incredibly diminutive of Indian cuisine in America. I'm sorry Michelin star means squat for Indian food. I have tried both and they are pretty crappy. Ah yes, Indian cuisine like "Bombay Sliders. Dude I've lived in Singapore. It costs nothing virtually to go to a park and play basketball so the kids who were poorest played basketball. It costs nothing to run so the kids who were poorest ran track. It costs a great deal of money to play golf in equipment and course fees The same with swimming The reason that soccer is the most popular sport in the world is that it only costs having a ball to play it. The poorer people dominate in the sports that require the least amount of money to play. Take a look at boxing What do they have to 'get out' of in general Source s: Add a comment. Asker's rating. Indian Gas Stations. They are more familiar with retail shops, convenience stores etc. So they tend to gravitate towards convenience stores and fuel station of which there are many in their native lands and easy to grasp. Which makes it ripe for asians. Also for asians owning a massive fuel station has prestige, it s seen as a land owning jobs and asians traditionally look positively at land owners. The high case in India are landowners. So for Indians owning a petrol station is prestigious as it s a land owning occupation. Asians would look unfavourably to say a b2b web design business because they can t see the tangiable assets of the business. If you are a basketball playerthen your straight leap is important but if you do have this problem you do not need certainly to fear because the solution is here now https: With Vert Shock program you'll gain 9 to 15 inches to your straight leap in only 8 week. This program is structured in 3 stages. And, ultimately, there's the Post-Shock period, that is simply for sealing in your newly obtained gains and creating parts of your muscles used to the quickly neurological response. Basic and simple Vert Shock gets the job performed! With one million newcomers, the latest wave of immigration is the second largest in New York City history. Just a decade ago, gas station ownership usually mirrored the ethnic makeup of the surrounding neighborhood. But now, about 40 percent of the city's stations are run or owned by South Asians, estimated Linda Sachs, a spokeswoman for the the city's Department of Consumer Affairs. This turnover in gas station ownership is one of the many images of a changing New York. While the new immigrants come from a vast spectrum of countries, with a heavy emphasis on Asian, South American and Caribbean nations, and work in a variety of jobs, they have also developed their own specialized niches, virtually monopolizing certain businesses or professions and slowly changing the commercial, political and cultural profile of the city. The forces that draw immigrant groups to certain occupations and businesses -- Indians to gas stations, Koreans and Dominicans to grocery stores and Afghans to fried chicken places -- are complex and varied. Their occupational choices are based on factors like skills and values learned in the old country, the paths followed by fellow immigrants who preceded them, or merely a lack of more attractive economic options. Sociologists agree that there is no universal pattern to these ethnic niches and that often labor specialization is random and hinges on availability of positions in certain localities. Indians, for example, may be preeminent in gas stations in New York, but in Los Angeles those business are dominated by a Korean quasi-monopoly. But once a niche is found, it creates a snowball effect, gathering in labor from that ethnic group and expanding exponentially. The common thread linking all immigrant work niches is the insider's edge on the profession. Ethnic labor, in particular family labor, is cheap and easily exploited and there is no linguistic, cultural or discriminatory barrier. Many immigrants are self-employed entrepreneurs. More than 85 percent of the 1, green grocer stores in the metropolitan area are owned and run by Koreans, sociologists say. The more than , Koreans who have come to New York also own novelty shops, beauty salons, liquor stores and dry cleaning. Indians and Pakistanis -- close to 95, of whom reside in the city -- have a virtual monopoly on newsstands. Since the mid's, they have been buying into gas stations, and their growing presence in the jewelry trade has made them the second largest ethnic group -- after Hasidic Jews -- in the Diamond District. Guyanese -- the fourth largest immigrant group -- can be found throughout the city's pharmacies and machinery repair shops. They also stand out, along with the Jamaicans and Irish, in the child-care business. Even the smallest of immigrant groups, like the Afghans and the Senegalese, have carved out their own niches. There are fewer than 4, Afghans in the city -- almost all war refugees -- yet they own more than fast-food chicken restaurants, Afghan businessmen say, in particular a non-franchised chain of more than 40 called Kennedy's Fried Chicken. The Senegalese, many of them already traders by profession, came to the United States via Europe and have prospered hawking a variety of wares on street corners throughout the city. Korean Success: Toil and Innovation. One of the the most visible successes has been the Koreans. An estimated , Koreans have come to the metropolitan area since the 's and 65 percent of Korean families own at least one business, said Pyong Gap Min, a professor of sociology at Queens College, who is a specialist on Koreans in the United States. Few Korean green grocers owned such stores in their homeland. But they arrived in the United States at a propitious time, when many Greeks, Italians and Jews were leaving the grocery business. Most were highly educated professionals with limited English skills and no business experience. But they had money to invest. The grocery stores were attractive because, although they required long, hard hours, they could be run with only basic shards of English. Find More Posts by Tarik One. Sep Posts: Ask PleezeBelieve and the chick on his avatar. Find More Posts by Killuminati Originally Posted by Tarik One I mean everywhere. Feb Posts: Find More Posts by Knuck the Ficks. 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One of the largest distribute Why do indians own gas stations of used automobile parts is owned by a Why do indians own gas stations owner. It is a multi million dollar business, has no debt, and I have stock in this company.

So, my suggestion is for you to seek confirmation of your generalizations. You will learn a lot. Statistics eg. Most of what you say is only true in the US. In China, Asians work at Gas Stations, Nail places, and play basketball and football not baseball - but that's the national sport in Japan, so plenty of Asians play it there. Their occupational choices are based on factors like skills and values learned in the old country, the paths followed by fellow immigrants who preceded them, or merely a lack of more attractive economic options.

Sociologists agree that there is no universal pattern to these ethnic niches and that often labor specialization is random and hinges on availability of positions in certain localities. Indians, for example, may be preeminent in gas stations in New York, but in Los Angeles those business are dominated by a Korean quasi-monopoly. Https://brazilian.katcr.press/count12433-meduw.php once a niche is found, click creates a snowball effect, gathering in labor from that ethnic group check this out expanding exponentially.

The common thread linking all immigrant work niches is the insider's edge on the profession. Ethnic labor, in particular family labor, is cheap and easily exploited and there is no linguistic, cultural or discriminatory barrier. Many immigrants are self-employed entrepreneurs. More than 85 percent of the 1, green grocer stores in the metropolitan area are owned and run by Koreans, sociologists say. The more thanKoreans who have Why do indians own gas stations to New York also own novelty shops, beauty salons, liquor stores and dry cleaning.

Indians and Pakistanis -- close to 95, of whom reside in the city -- have a virtual monopoly on newsstands. Since the mid's, they have been buying into gas stations, and their growing presence in the jewelry trade has made them the second largest ethnic group -- after Hasidic Jews -- in the Diamond District. Guyanese -- the fourth largest immigrant group -- can be found throughout the city's pharmacies and machinery repair shops. They also stand out, along with the Jamaicans and Irish, in the child-care business.

Even the smallest of immigrant groups, like the Afghans and the Senegalese, have carved out their own niches. There are fewer than 4, Afghans in the city -- almost all war refugees -- yet they own more than fast-food chicken restaurants, Afghan businessmen say, in particular a non-franchised chain of more than 40 called Kennedy's Fried Chicken. The Senegalese, many of them already traders by profession, came to the United States via Europe and Why do indians own gas stations prospered hawking a variety of wares on street corners throughout the city.

Korean Success: Toil and Innovation. One of the the most visible successes has been the Koreans. An estimatedKoreans Why do indians own gas stations come to the metropolitan area since the 's and 65 percent of Korean families own at least one business, said Pyong Gap Min, a professor of sociology at Queens College, who is a specialist on Koreans in the United States.

Few Korean green grocers owned such stores in their homeland. But they arrived in the United States at a propitious time, when many Greeks, Italians and Jews were leaving the grocery business. Most were highly educated professionals with limited English skills and no business experience.

But they had money to invest. The grocery stores were attractive because, although they required long, hard hours, they could be run with only basic shards of English.

In the United States, they revamped and spruced up the stores, filling the demand for items beyond the basics of the old grocery store. New immigrants learned the business from fellow Koreans before they invested in their own Why do indians own gas stations.

Although Koreans in New York City were already firmly entrenched in the trade of Korean products, green grocers were their first businesses not tied to the products of their homeland, Professor Min said.

The snowballing success of Korean grocers is due in part to an extensive and well-organized support system. New arrivals can rely on a page Korean business directory, as well as dozens of business groups, including the Korean Green Grocer Association.

When black residents of Flatbush, Brooklyn, organized a boycott of two Korean grocers inWhy do indians own gas stations instance, fellow Korean grocers put up money to help the stores remain in business. Busty milf shower.

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The story totally checks out. I moved from Boston to San Francisco indid a cross country drive. Every day, around 3 PM, I would pull in into the parking lot and locate a Motel 30 or 40 miles ahead using the GPS and Streets software, and call and book a room. Being a 1st generation Indian immigrant myself, almost always the owners would relate to me and tell me their immigrant story.

And yes, almost all of them said the same thing the story mentions, i. One of them even shared their Why do indians own gas stations dinner with me as I'd arrive late and all the restaurants were closed in the Area Eureka, CA Not all of them carried the business forward though.

As told by their fathers neither one wanted anything to do with the Motel business, but they put in their work as kids, working at the motel while off school and such.

He Why do indians own gas stations had a family run motel in Portland and would tell more info stories of how everyone in the family had to pitch in to make it work.

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Gujjus are hard working people and Why do indians own gas stations really admire their Why do indians own gas stations ethics and grit. Their network went well beyond any particular industry though. The first family friend visit web page come to this country ended up in Houston in the early 70s, quickly accumulated wealth by innovating accounting techniques for big oil.

He sponsored the next wave, which included her father who started as a nuclear plant engineer and travelled around the country for a couple decades before moving into finance then hospitality. Each successive wave would sponsor others - they all were relatively successful in India but came here to be executives at tech companies, surgeons, professors, real estate investors, etc.

They really took care of each other. While the family did much of what was mentioned in the article, including living at the Days Inn for a couple years at one point, it didn't mention anything about partnership stakes in these properties.

That seemed to be a big thing, or at least I had the impression that diversifying property portfolios was common. Her father owned his properties outright but that was because he bought his partners out during the financial collapse in When we last talked 2 years back, he was looking to acquire new partners and invest in other properties. As you say, there was a tension to bring the children in but they had Why do indians own gas stations interest in moving to a place in a so-so part of Florida - the children were well educated, travelled, cultured etc and preferred to live in big cities.

My ex and I did grudgingly discuss it as being an option if we started a family. I had a Gujrati friend while doing my Engineering in Bangalore. He quit round about the 5th Semester, went to the US to start a Motel. And from what I heard the last he had like a chain. Never returned and finished his engineering though.

I remember starting round about the 2nd semester he would frequently visit the US to see his cousins who ran Motels. He was quite famous in the class that he used to get us all sorts of rare merchandise from the US not available back then in India.

I'm talking about the time when Why do indians own gas stations bar of Snickers was like an exotic chocolate in India. One of things you will see in certain Indian communities Gujrat, Kerala, Tamil Nadu, Bengal is a very high degree of community affection and willingness to help their kind. I heard the family based GC, I guess that EB3 wait times are now like 16 years, largely because once a family comes, they apply GCs for everyone in their family.

The Gujaratis are known for being very enterprising folks. It is culturally respected in the community to have your own business, whether it is a small corner Why do indians own gas stations or the biggest corporation. Why do indians own gas stations and the current PM also hail from this state.

The downside is that some of the biggest and famous crooks are from the same community as well. If we accept the premise that Gujaratis are particularly enterprising, then unless they are particularly less prone to criminal behavior than other communities we should except some enterprising crooks as well! There's lots of famous financial fraudsters and crooks from any community. I'm not sure such comments are appreciated on HN. All communities and groups in the world have crooks.

I am talking about some of the biggest and famous crooks in Article source not just any crook.

Why do indians own gas stations

Which is an irrelevant point and needlessly pedantic in the context of this thread about Gujjus. Why do indians own gas stations I hope is even less appreciated on HN is the pointless "yeah that's true of any community" nonsense the minute anyone says anything with specificity. Mikeb85 7 months ago. Can't say criminals aren't enterprising. At least successful criminals.

Wife cheating on husband sex stories

There's a much older and a much more substantive article Why do indians own gas stations this as well: I stayed at a very good Why do indians own gas stations run one in Ukiah last summer, maybe the same family? This model has led to success for other immigrant groups in other industries. Once a family purchased a motel, they would live there, and the family members would do all the tasks needed to run it, from cleaning rooms to checking in guests.

That helped keep costs down, and profits went toward acquiring new motels. By the s Gujaratis had come to dominate the industry.

The "killer app" here appears to be a lack of source beyond established relationships. Because of this, whole families were willing to spend their time doing work that most Americans feel is not worth their time. It's not just that most Americans feel these jobs aren't worth their time. There is a very strong individualist streak in American culture and a very strong taboo against lending friends or family members money for any reason.

Why do indians own gas stations are plenty of American families who Why do indians own gas stations relations who could easily help bootstrap a profitable small business in the way described here. It just doesn't happen that way very often.

Sexy lithuanian Watch Video Illeagel porn. But they too will one day suffer the same fate. Subsequent generations won't have to work as hard as they are already comfortable. Little by little they will spread out, move away, and their once mighty army is no more. From my perspective as a true 3rd gen American all G-Grandparents came from Europe around the same time is that by the third generation, there are no more cultural roots. And family is culture so family dissolves as well. My mother and father were the last to really care and my father was very meh about his Polish heritage. My mother was adamant, keeping traditions alive for as long as possible but the local family thinned out as the rest moved away. She is probably the last to really care about family and cultural roots which bound the early immigrants, and their children. There are good reasons that many people avoid lending money to or even doing business with close friends and relatives. If the venture doesn't succeed, and the friend is unable to repay the loan, it can create animosity and bitterness that wreck the relationship. Even if things go well, it can create an uncomfortable power dynamic that makes the relationship less pleasant and friendly. I grew up in a community that was just coming out of this phase the combined Israeli and Persian Jewish communities of LA. I think you're interpreting "relations" in a way too close to the "relatives" of the relatively atomized White American society. Informal immigrant aid networks are generally wider than "close friends and relatives" - they extend to distant cousins and friends-of-friends. For a concrete example of how this works in the Middle Eastern Jewish community, and historically in the Ashkenazi immigrant Jewish community: The act of the intermediary is a one-time intervention and said interaction is usually closed out with a direct thanks or a gift or both, rather than being an ongoing professional relationship. If the venture doesn't succeed you'll have an awkward relationship with the two-hops-removed acquaintance, and the one-hop-removed intermediary will know about it and be less likely to recommend you to others for credit, but real social consequences that extend to direct friends and relatives are reserved for those who are considered to have acted maliciously or irresponsibly e. Search for "credit" in this article on immigrant enclaves for some examples of communities with these kinds of social structures: I also think a middle-class family is in the "sweet spot" where they have a lot to lose from offering a loan as opposed to either not having a lot to lose in the first place or being so well-off that they can easily just write off a bad investment. StillBored 7 months ago. So, family loans are often viewed more as gifts. To some admittedly fuzzy degree what you describe is a symptom of what I describe, not a causal reason for the taboo or individualistic tendency to exist. Jeff Bezos also got a loan from his parents. To be fair, with Jeff Bezos and his parents it wasn't a loan but purchased equity that is now worth billions. TangoTrotFox 7 months ago. His father did not wish him well, Musk recalls. He called me an idiot all the time. He paid nothing for college. My brother and I paid for college through scholarships, loans and working two jobs simultaneously. The funding we raised for our first company came from a small group of random angel investors in Silicon Valley. If I ever loaned my family money, I'd make them sign a secured, transferable note and then sell it off as quickly as possible. I'd rather extend a monetary gift without any expectation of repayment. Any money-related issue is bound to sour relations with your family sooner or later. Business partners that fall out can go their separate ways, but when your sister-in-law cheats her siblings out of their shares of the estate--because she opened the account for her Mom, and it was a joint account, just in case something happened to her--that brews some resentment. Loans make you involved in the borrower's business, and when things so bad, you need to be able to exercise all your options. Your lazy brother-in-law probably isn't going to prioritize making the loan payment to you over buying a new snowblower, or whatever other toy. Your sleazy brother-in-law might just default, claim your loan was actually a gift, and all but dare you to sue him. So it isn't just that there is a taboo against lending, but there is an insufficiently strong tradition of honoring personal commitments and sacrificing of one's self for the sake of the family. The way to make loans to family and friends is straightforward. Make a small loan. If they pay it back, then loan larger amounts. If they don't pay it back, you have the perfect excuse to never loan them any more. I think we got it from the British. Act 1, scene 3: Are those actual early millionaires or just retirees with retirement savings? Early millionaires. The article makes it pretty clear. It probably captures mostly retirees. As for the article, the people in it seem to need to continue living a frugal lifestyle after early retirement, so they aren't exactly wealthy. Financially independent, yes, but not wealthy. The article is about retiring at 30 as a millionaire, and yes that requires living a frugal lifestyle. But if you're willing to work longer, far less frugality is needed. The book is pretty cheap! There are lots of financial advice books, this is one of the better ones, and the advice is straightforward. It doesn't involve learning option trading or real estate hacks. I don't really think one paragraph follows from the other. You say Americans are uniquely unwilling to pool their financial resources to family members, then cite examples of that happening. No, I say they're unwilling to in the way described, and cite examples of how specifically it usually works. It's less taboo than years of hearing stories of ended family relationships where money was loaned and then abused, mishandled, wasted, etc without any intention of paying it back. I've heard these types of stories my entire life. Yeah, money is the number one reason marriages break up, and I have seen the same happen to siblings. However, most people I know have borrowed from their parents for things like their first car or the downpayment on their first house if they need to. Is that not normal? The reasoning behind this is that business relationships can become incredibly sour, and "never seeing them again" is a pressure release that exists among strangers in New York but not among close family or best friends. Never heard of this before. Why do you think it is so the taboo? I read some replies to your comment below, just want to see if you think something different. Spooky23 7 months ago. Americans want less risk, and fiscal policy drives consolidation. Many Americans come from a cultural background where there is shame involved in talking about money and doing business with family, and prefer dealing with institutions. These motels are more like new franchises than a startup. Shivetya 7 months ago. I would have put it more at not about lending them money but the strong desire to strike out on their own. Timmah 7 months ago. Another important difference is the free-labor-from-your-kids benefit. From what it appears, Indian families are more cohesive and their kids are less rebellious at least 1st generation. I'm aware there are also American children who work in their parents small businesses, but I think they are more likely to demand compensation. Not that "immense". Gates did not start Microsoft with a loan from his parents, it was entirely bootstrapped financially. Paul Allen and Gates had saved up a small amount of money from contract work. Together they provided all of Microsoft's seed capital. They had customers for Microsoft essentially from the start of the business MITS being the first , making it profitable nearly from day one. Which completely bypasses the point that their parents had to be wealthy enough to provide for his education at a school that had computing labs at a time that they were very rare. Bill Gates and Paul Allen certainly had to work their tails off, but negating that having a wealthy parent puts you in a far higher likelihood to be successful is just silly. The average child of poor parents is not likely to have the same opportunity as those of a child of wealthy parents. It's exactly what perpetuates the cycle of wealth. Lots of people started microcomputer companies at about the same time as Gates. Evidently, not attending Lakeside was not a barrier. Hardly "immense". My parents bought a car for me to drive back when I was a teen. I wrote "new" car. What valuation do you give his mother's influence over the board at IBM? It's unknowable. But keep in mind that Microsoft was already established and very successful at the time, and Gates was a very astute and aggressive businessman. Microsoft was the biggest player in microcomputer software at the time. Why wouldn't they check? And how much credence would IBM give a mom who had little knowledge of computers and software who suggested checking out her son? Lastly, the accounts of her advising IBM to use her son's company are not verifiable. IBM went to Gary Kildall first. I really dislike this argument. Yet, this is a consistent argument whenever an employer-employee relationship comes up. That's not because manual labour is beneath me. The thing is - at a low enough price point, no work is worth anyone's time. Those family members were probably working for below minimum wage. It's not culture. It's economics. For the family member, it's more like receiving massive equity stake with little to no salary. A friend of mine had his great uncle come to America penniless in the '80s. They own apartment buildings in Queens now. That's because a year-old kid is going to come home, finish homework, and then man the store for three hours, taking over from his older sister. Daycare is free because the year-old will manage the year-old and the year-old will manage the 6-year-old when the teenager is out. It's a tough life, and I don't wish it upon my kids but that shit went straight to equity. Those kids are now well off middle aged people, and when their parents the original immigrants pass, the grandkids will be fabulously wealthy. It is about economics and expectations. It is the same reason there is a "shortage" in technology yet thousands of Indians applying for those jobs -- because most American students dont want to live in outer San Jose, San Martin, or Rucker and commute for 4hrs or live in nasty apartments. Most Americans also dont want to be tied on Production Support getting calls all night for crap wages. And frankly, I dont blame you. I'm a computer science grad in the US. The bay area wages, even while inflated, are not living wages for families, certainly nothing given my excellent education I'm in management. I work half the hours, and earn a good pay. It's almost like that's the price the market is willing to bear! Yet, we only use this sort of judgmental language to express outrage at employees, unwilling to work at a price below what the market is willing to bear. You realize I'm agreeing with you right? You are looking at the Palo Alto market, or San Jose market. I'm Indian American. I grew up in the US and got a top-3 school CS degree. I'm unwilling to live like my father. Hence I dont compete with H1s on the "jobs going unfilled" because they dont meet my expectations. Luckily I and probably you have options. My father didnt. We're lucky and we can be picky with where we live. You and I are unwilling to do so. Others will. The specific term for what you're talking about is arbitrage. You're making a high wage in the city, but choosing to live in a lower cost of living area and keeping the difference. As someone who commuted hours each way for years, this absolutely works and you don't even need to be a specific ethnicity. I've worked my way up from crappy jobs cleaning up sewer damage, to a call center, then an IT dept, and now into IT management. Nevermind that scheduling family members to work can be much easier than a worker you hire, which lets a small business run with fewer employees working more valuable hours. The killer app here seems to be access to capital on amazing terms. They don't say how big is the loan, nor how many were needed to buy the hotel. They might have had to shake hands with everyone in their family. AdamM12 7 months ago. Worked in restaurant industry. Latino workers had a pool of money that the all put into and if I remember correctly they rotated who the paid it out to for big purchases like this. I think they mainly used it for like cars and homes. I had an ex-girlfriend whose family did this. I had no idea it was a cultural thing she was from Mexico. I just just thought it was specific to her family. If I remember correctly though, it caused a far amount of problems because people would often stop paying after their turn. Yeah I can imagine. Really has to be close nit so you can put social pressures. These are called https: Pretty common in countries where access to the formal banking sector, especially for women who are home-makers, is complicated. Awesome didn't know what the formal name was. Excellent observation! This is the basis of "chit funds" https: Similar schemes also apparently exist in countries like S Korea per my Korean neighbor. But in the motel instances outlined here, anecdotally, lending circles are not used. It's typically a small group of family members or very close friends with a pool of money to "lend". Yes, having family members work for you for free is legal. My accountant once encouraged me to try to get my family members involved in a business I ran just for that reason. I think the question of age comes into play though. But there are an awful lot of very young family members working on commercial farms. This was on a farm. As an adult, it seems that anything kids might do around the house, they might do in a family-owned motel. If there are laws against that they are bad laws and also inconsistently enforced. There's a family business exception. Underaged labor is legal in the USA as long as they are employed by their parents and the work isn't in manufacturing, mining or occupations declared hazardous. You could make the argument that startup founders who aren't taking a salary from their early stage startup are also performing "free, illegally so" labor. I think in that case, you can't work for yourself illegally. HeyLaughingBoy 7 months ago. If the startup is incorporated, then you're working for the corporation, not for "yourself. The original blockchain: There's an interesting ancient pattern of small minority groups dominating certain businesses, often ones which need trust -- here "handshake loans", but traditionally also simply payment for goods shipped long-distances. The Greek trader in one little Egyptian town could be more confident in dealing with another Greek trader somewhere in Italy, a week's sail away, because while he might be tempted to run off with the money, word would get around, and soon no other Greek would trust the guy, nobody would marry his sons This mechanism didn't work for people from the majority community, because they weren't so specialised, could do other business, could find another priest Thus the Greeks could ship things cheaper, and won the business. The Patels, and related Gujarati groups, have been in this kind of trust-heavy long-distance trade for centuries. They spread all over East Africa in the 19th C, and did very well. It's sort of common knowledge in India that Gujaratis, Sindhis, Punjabis and Malayalis Keralites are generally pretty enterprising and are often businessmen, both within India and abroad. There can be other such Indian communities too, of course. These are just the ones I have heard of from childhood as tending to be more so. Again, I don't mean to rule out other places where these or other Indians could have gone, these are just the ones I am more familiar with, and may have relatively high concentrations. Be interesting to know if there are other places where particular groups have gone and done well. Of course, lots of Indians went to Fiji and Malaysia too, I've read, although those may have mostly gone as plantation labor initially and some to Trinidad and Tobago, Guyana, etc. Don't know how those are doing now. I guess it is both because they use some different local Malaysian ingredients, and because of the long time of separation from India must have made their cuisine evolved to be somewhat different. It was interesting stuff, though. Yes indeed, they specialise within India too. One of the largest distribute rs of used automobile parts is owned by a black owner. It is a multi million dollar business, has no debt, and I have stock in this company. So, my suggestion is for you to seek confirmation of your generalizations. You will learn a lot. Statistics eg. Most of what you say is only true in the US. In China, Asians work at Gas Stations, Nail places, and play basketball and football not baseball - but that's the national sport in Japan, so plenty of Asians play it there. Golf is expensive, so only wealthy people get to play it very often. So, in the US, it's mostly to do with history and how it effected statistics. Those business people and golfers you're talking about grew up in wealthy families - and because of history white people are still wealthier than black people in the US but in various countries in Africa and the Middle East, black people run all the businesses and play golf and cricket. And I come from Australia - with a population the size of a city in China, the US, or Russia, we always manage to pull a solid 4th place in the Olympics So we do good at sports not because we're black, white, Asian or other, but because we're Australian!!! More to do with culture, history and statistics, than anything to do with race. Just get out of here, dude. You make me want to talk about plotting to destroy the white house like you were talking to everybody about earlier, trying to recruit people just so the government catches you. Google it or Yahoo it. Winning Sport Picks http: People get influenced by their surroundings and their friends, thats why And success depends on involvement, and involvement is easy when you are part of that group. Pagination 1. Existing questions. Why do Blacks majority play the victim?!?!? More questions. Why blacks are so underachievers in the majority of sports? Parmjit Singh's gas stations are held up an average of two times a month. Two Indian employees have been shot and killed during stickups, Mr. Singh said. Afghan Refugees: Evading Barriers. In the vast maze of cultures, Afghans offer yet another insight into the ethnic division of labor. One of the smallest and most recent groups of immigrants in the city, they are refugees from the fierce decade-long war in Afghanistan. Many of them lack higher education, trade skills, and have little knowledge of English. They are generally poor when they arrive. And unlike the Koreans and the Indians, their struggle for survival has had an impact on only a very specialized part of the city's economy. In the last decade, with more than stores, the Afghans have become specialists in the fast-food chicken business. To circumvent language and discrimination barriers, even their carpenters and chicken suppliers they use are Afghans. Their niche in the business originated in , when Abdul Karim Halemi, a student from Kandahar in Southern Afghanistan, got his first job was in the kitchen at Kansas Fried Chicken. A year later, he opened the first Kennedy's Fried Chicken. Now there are 40 unfranchised restaurants with that name -- all owned by Afghans, Mr. Halemi said. Halemi said he and other established Afghan immigrants in New York lead the new arrivals by the hand through the chicken fast-food business. The tough part is teaching them the intricacies of running a business in New York City. Halemi, who still works at his restaurant on Rockaway Boulevard in Queens behind the protection of bulletproof glass. When the new ones come to the store, they sit. They watch. They learn and then they work. An article on Jan. As Mr. Because of an editing error, a picture caption with the article misstated the number of gas stations Mr. Singh now owns. It is two. Please upgrade your browser. See next articles. View page in TimesMachine. Toil and Innovation One of the the most visible successes has been the Koreans. Jun Posts: Find More Posts by Tarik One. Sep Posts: Ask PleezeBelieve and the chick on his avatar. Find More Posts by Killuminati Originally Posted by Tarik One I mean everywhere. Feb Posts: Find More Posts by Knuck the Ficks. Apr Location: I walk the earth Kung Fu style Posts: Join Date: Jul Location: Find More Posts by emsteez forreal. ATL Posts: I have heard some Dooms-like theories regarding this. Find More Posts by phoenix.

Instead the typical means to wealth is inheritance or luck of birth providing access to Insane double anal capital not loans and business connections.

For every WhatsApp there's a dozen or more Microsofts and Facebooks Gates and Zuckerberg both benefitted from the immense social and financial capital their families could provide.

I might call an unwillingness to help others assuming one can afford to do so selfishness -- not individualism. But what I have seen in American is, as you said, individualism: People are prideful and want to create wealth without help. An interesting clarification: People will more readily accept help from strangers -- e.

There's talk elsewhere in this article's comments here about the "killer feature" that these Indian Americans have. I would argue that the true killer feature is not Why do indians own gas stations access to zero-interest capital. It's a culture that actively fights against pride and individualism. There are surely tradeoffs, but it's hard to deny the power that can come from children and adults alike all looking to family for help I don't think it's about pride at all.

I think it's about face something most Americans don't even have a word for, but which is Why do indians own gas stations relevant Why do indians own gas stations this case. Americans don't want to give face to anyone, ever. Read more don't want anyone to have social power over them. When an individual loans you money—or, even worse, gifts you money—you're giving them a ton of face in exchange.

Americans find that idea horrifying. It's like signing up for indentured servitude, except—since it's a social rather than legal obligation—you can't even get out of it by declaring bankruptcy!

Bank loans and VC investments are better precisely because they're legal rather than social obligations, so you can get out of them or, say, sell them off to someone else along with the business.

And Kickstarter is better because no single individual is responsible for enough of the Why do indians own gas stations to actually attain much social-obligatory power over you in exchange.

Hotel sex Watch Video Sex Workar. His father did not wish him well, Musk recalls. He called me an idiot all the time. He paid nothing for college. My brother and I paid for college through scholarships, loans and working two jobs simultaneously. The funding we raised for our first company came from a small group of random angel investors in Silicon Valley. If I ever loaned my family money, I'd make them sign a secured, transferable note and then sell it off as quickly as possible. I'd rather extend a monetary gift without any expectation of repayment. Any money-related issue is bound to sour relations with your family sooner or later. Business partners that fall out can go their separate ways, but when your sister-in-law cheats her siblings out of their shares of the estate--because she opened the account for her Mom, and it was a joint account, just in case something happened to her--that brews some resentment. Loans make you involved in the borrower's business, and when things so bad, you need to be able to exercise all your options. Your lazy brother-in-law probably isn't going to prioritize making the loan payment to you over buying a new snowblower, or whatever other toy. Your sleazy brother-in-law might just default, claim your loan was actually a gift, and all but dare you to sue him. So it isn't just that there is a taboo against lending, but there is an insufficiently strong tradition of honoring personal commitments and sacrificing of one's self for the sake of the family. The way to make loans to family and friends is straightforward. Make a small loan. If they pay it back, then loan larger amounts. If they don't pay it back, you have the perfect excuse to never loan them any more. I think we got it from the British. Act 1, scene 3: Are those actual early millionaires or just retirees with retirement savings? Early millionaires. The article makes it pretty clear. It probably captures mostly retirees. As for the article, the people in it seem to need to continue living a frugal lifestyle after early retirement, so they aren't exactly wealthy. Financially independent, yes, but not wealthy. The article is about retiring at 30 as a millionaire, and yes that requires living a frugal lifestyle. But if you're willing to work longer, far less frugality is needed. The book is pretty cheap! There are lots of financial advice books, this is one of the better ones, and the advice is straightforward. It doesn't involve learning option trading or real estate hacks. I don't really think one paragraph follows from the other. You say Americans are uniquely unwilling to pool their financial resources to family members, then cite examples of that happening. No, I say they're unwilling to in the way described, and cite examples of how specifically it usually works. It's less taboo than years of hearing stories of ended family relationships where money was loaned and then abused, mishandled, wasted, etc without any intention of paying it back. I've heard these types of stories my entire life. Yeah, money is the number one reason marriages break up, and I have seen the same happen to siblings. However, most people I know have borrowed from their parents for things like their first car or the downpayment on their first house if they need to. Is that not normal? The reasoning behind this is that business relationships can become incredibly sour, and "never seeing them again" is a pressure release that exists among strangers in New York but not among close family or best friends. Never heard of this before. Why do you think it is so the taboo? I read some replies to your comment below, just want to see if you think something different. Spooky23 7 months ago. Americans want less risk, and fiscal policy drives consolidation. Many Americans come from a cultural background where there is shame involved in talking about money and doing business with family, and prefer dealing with institutions. These motels are more like new franchises than a startup. Shivetya 7 months ago. I would have put it more at not about lending them money but the strong desire to strike out on their own. Timmah 7 months ago. Another important difference is the free-labor-from-your-kids benefit. From what it appears, Indian families are more cohesive and their kids are less rebellious at least 1st generation. I'm aware there are also American children who work in their parents small businesses, but I think they are more likely to demand compensation. Not that "immense". Gates did not start Microsoft with a loan from his parents, it was entirely bootstrapped financially. Paul Allen and Gates had saved up a small amount of money from contract work. Together they provided all of Microsoft's seed capital. They had customers for Microsoft essentially from the start of the business MITS being the first , making it profitable nearly from day one. Which completely bypasses the point that their parents had to be wealthy enough to provide for his education at a school that had computing labs at a time that they were very rare. Bill Gates and Paul Allen certainly had to work their tails off, but negating that having a wealthy parent puts you in a far higher likelihood to be successful is just silly. The average child of poor parents is not likely to have the same opportunity as those of a child of wealthy parents. It's exactly what perpetuates the cycle of wealth. Lots of people started microcomputer companies at about the same time as Gates. Evidently, not attending Lakeside was not a barrier. Hardly "immense". My parents bought a car for me to drive back when I was a teen. I wrote "new" car. What valuation do you give his mother's influence over the board at IBM? It's unknowable. But keep in mind that Microsoft was already established and very successful at the time, and Gates was a very astute and aggressive businessman. Microsoft was the biggest player in microcomputer software at the time. Why wouldn't they check? And how much credence would IBM give a mom who had little knowledge of computers and software who suggested checking out her son? Lastly, the accounts of her advising IBM to use her son's company are not verifiable. IBM went to Gary Kildall first. I really dislike this argument. Yet, this is a consistent argument whenever an employer-employee relationship comes up. That's not because manual labour is beneath me. The thing is - at a low enough price point, no work is worth anyone's time. Those family members were probably working for below minimum wage. It's not culture. It's economics. For the family member, it's more like receiving massive equity stake with little to no salary. A friend of mine had his great uncle come to America penniless in the '80s. They own apartment buildings in Queens now. That's because a year-old kid is going to come home, finish homework, and then man the store for three hours, taking over from his older sister. Daycare is free because the year-old will manage the year-old and the year-old will manage the 6-year-old when the teenager is out. It's a tough life, and I don't wish it upon my kids but that shit went straight to equity. Those kids are now well off middle aged people, and when their parents the original immigrants pass, the grandkids will be fabulously wealthy. It is about economics and expectations. It is the same reason there is a "shortage" in technology yet thousands of Indians applying for those jobs -- because most American students dont want to live in outer San Jose, San Martin, or Rucker and commute for 4hrs or live in nasty apartments. Most Americans also dont want to be tied on Production Support getting calls all night for crap wages. And frankly, I dont blame you. I'm a computer science grad in the US. The bay area wages, even while inflated, are not living wages for families, certainly nothing given my excellent education I'm in management. I work half the hours, and earn a good pay. It's almost like that's the price the market is willing to bear! Yet, we only use this sort of judgmental language to express outrage at employees, unwilling to work at a price below what the market is willing to bear. You realize I'm agreeing with you right? You are looking at the Palo Alto market, or San Jose market. I'm Indian American. I grew up in the US and got a top-3 school CS degree. I'm unwilling to live like my father. Hence I dont compete with H1s on the "jobs going unfilled" because they dont meet my expectations. Luckily I and probably you have options. My father didnt. We're lucky and we can be picky with where we live. You and I are unwilling to do so. Others will. The specific term for what you're talking about is arbitrage. You're making a high wage in the city, but choosing to live in a lower cost of living area and keeping the difference. As someone who commuted hours each way for years, this absolutely works and you don't even need to be a specific ethnicity. I've worked my way up from crappy jobs cleaning up sewer damage, to a call center, then an IT dept, and now into IT management. Nevermind that scheduling family members to work can be much easier than a worker you hire, which lets a small business run with fewer employees working more valuable hours. The killer app here seems to be access to capital on amazing terms. They don't say how big is the loan, nor how many were needed to buy the hotel. They might have had to shake hands with everyone in their family. AdamM12 7 months ago. Worked in restaurant industry. Latino workers had a pool of money that the all put into and if I remember correctly they rotated who the paid it out to for big purchases like this. I think they mainly used it for like cars and homes. I had an ex-girlfriend whose family did this. I had no idea it was a cultural thing she was from Mexico. I just just thought it was specific to her family. If I remember correctly though, it caused a far amount of problems because people would often stop paying after their turn. Yeah I can imagine. Really has to be close nit so you can put social pressures. These are called https: Pretty common in countries where access to the formal banking sector, especially for women who are home-makers, is complicated. Awesome didn't know what the formal name was. Excellent observation! This is the basis of "chit funds" https: Similar schemes also apparently exist in countries like S Korea per my Korean neighbor. But in the motel instances outlined here, anecdotally, lending circles are not used. It's typically a small group of family members or very close friends with a pool of money to "lend". Yes, having family members work for you for free is legal. My accountant once encouraged me to try to get my family members involved in a business I ran just for that reason. I think the question of age comes into play though. But there are an awful lot of very young family members working on commercial farms. This was on a farm. As an adult, it seems that anything kids might do around the house, they might do in a family-owned motel. If there are laws against that they are bad laws and also inconsistently enforced. There's a family business exception. Underaged labor is legal in the USA as long as they are employed by their parents and the work isn't in manufacturing, mining or occupations declared hazardous. You could make the argument that startup founders who aren't taking a salary from their early stage startup are also performing "free, illegally so" labor. I think in that case, you can't work for yourself illegally. HeyLaughingBoy 7 months ago. If the startup is incorporated, then you're working for the corporation, not for "yourself. The original blockchain: There's an interesting ancient pattern of small minority groups dominating certain businesses, often ones which need trust -- here "handshake loans", but traditionally also simply payment for goods shipped long-distances. The Greek trader in one little Egyptian town could be more confident in dealing with another Greek trader somewhere in Italy, a week's sail away, because while he might be tempted to run off with the money, word would get around, and soon no other Greek would trust the guy, nobody would marry his sons This mechanism didn't work for people from the majority community, because they weren't so specialised, could do other business, could find another priest Thus the Greeks could ship things cheaper, and won the business. The Patels, and related Gujarati groups, have been in this kind of trust-heavy long-distance trade for centuries. They spread all over East Africa in the 19th C, and did very well. It's sort of common knowledge in India that Gujaratis, Sindhis, Punjabis and Malayalis Keralites are generally pretty enterprising and are often businessmen, both within India and abroad. There can be other such Indian communities too, of course. These are just the ones I have heard of from childhood as tending to be more so. Again, I don't mean to rule out other places where these or other Indians could have gone, these are just the ones I am more familiar with, and may have relatively high concentrations. Be interesting to know if there are other places where particular groups have gone and done well. Of course, lots of Indians went to Fiji and Malaysia too, I've read, although those may have mostly gone as plantation labor initially and some to Trinidad and Tobago, Guyana, etc. Don't know how those are doing now. I guess it is both because they use some different local Malaysian ingredients, and because of the long time of separation from India must have made their cuisine evolved to be somewhat different. It was interesting stuff, though. Yes indeed, they specialise within India too. And surely some of the same network benefits may apply there too. Surely Parsi entrepreneurs a century ago got better loans It's also my hazy impression that the plantation-labor Indian groups haven't done nearly as well on the whole. Another example is the surprisingly high proportion of overseas Chinese who are from Fujian. Could be. I do know that Parsis are said to take care of the elderly and poor of their community. They have retirement homes and do charity for them, etc. They are generally philantropic too, like some others. Good of them. I recently learned about oulipo https: Lack of resources can be sometimes a blessing in disguise whether it is literature or hard business. I wonder why Americans don't do this maybe they do, I don't know - why borrow from banks or VCs etc with strict strings attached, instead of supporting one another based on trust? There has been a long term decline of community banks, which might be the more American equivalent of this kind of lending. The Small Business Administration also helps with loan guarantees. So the support is sort of there, but takes a different form, and maybe one could say the impersonal nature of it is both a strength and a weakness in comparison. Numbers of small businesses and their starts have been in decline too. I suspect this has to do with the difficulty of more and more Americans in attaining any savings from their wages let alone enough to set aside to help capitalize a small business. I suspect this has to do with the difficulty of more and more Americans in attaining any savings from their wages All the more important to support one another. Although, if everyone in a person's trust circle is more or less in the same boat, then tough luck: Some non profits are working in this space too. After Sandy, some orgs in NY were giving interest free loans to small biz people who lost their trucks etc. Americans are forced by law and convention into living a very specific kind of life. Lots of things they do and "own" require substantial investment of money and time. A regular not minimum wage is calibrated to just barely take care of all that, and modern marketing specializes in "educating" our tastes so that we can really tell the difference between e. Although on average they are poorer, residents of India have a great deal more freedom with respect to the costs of everyday life. Find More Posts by emsteez forreal. ATL Posts: I have heard some Dooms-like theories regarding this. Find More Posts by phoenix Jan Posts: Find More Posts by Akrazotile. Dec Posts: Find More Posts by DukeDelonte Providence, RI Posts: Find More Posts by code green. Aug Location: NYC Posts: Why do all Chinese restaurants look the same? Find More Posts by Patrick Chewing. Mar Location: Am I here to amuse you? This program is structured in 3 stages. And, ultimately, there's the Post-Shock period, that is simply for sealing in your newly obtained gains and creating parts of your muscles used to the quickly neurological response. Basic and simple Vert Shock gets the job performed! For the best answers, search on this site https: However, you are making some strong generalizations. Eastern Indians are involved in many businesses, not just gas stations. As well, the owners of gas stations are distributed across our nation with a greater number of these businesses clustered around highly populated areas. There are many Indians involved in technological production. Bose sound systems is owned by Eastern Indians. Many Internet providers are owned and managed by Eastern Indians. They participate in companies that manage stock portfolios, as well as Asians. A lot of nail salons are owned by blacks, and other cultures. These salons are not dominated by Asian ownership. Blacks are active participants and owners of many manufacturing companies. One of the largest distribute rs of used automobile parts is owned by a black owner. It is a multi million dollar business, has no debt, and I have stock in this company. So, my suggestion is for you to seek confirmation of your generalizations. You will learn a lot. Statistics eg. Most of what you say is only true in the US. In China, Asians work at Gas Stations, Nail places, and play basketball and football not baseball - but that's the national sport in Japan, so plenty of Asians play it there. Golf is expensive, so only wealthy people get to play it very often. So, in the US, it's mostly to do with history and how it effected statistics. Those business people and golfers you're talking about grew up in wealthy families - and because of history white people are still wealthier than black people in the US but in various countries in Africa and the Middle East, black people run all the businesses and play golf and cricket. Halemi said he and other established Afghan immigrants in New York lead the new arrivals by the hand through the chicken fast-food business. The tough part is teaching them the intricacies of running a business in New York City. Halemi, who still works at his restaurant on Rockaway Boulevard in Queens behind the protection of bulletproof glass. When the new ones come to the store, they sit. They watch. They learn and then they work. An article on Jan. As Mr. Because of an editing error, a picture caption with the article misstated the number of gas stations Mr. Singh now owns. It is two. Please upgrade your browser. See next articles. View page in TimesMachine. Toil and Innovation One of the the most visible successes has been the Koreans. Newsletter Sign Up Continue reading the main story Please verify you're not a robot by clicking the box. Invalid email address. Please re-enter. You must select a newsletter to subscribe to. Sign Up. You will receive emails containing news content , updates and promotions from The New York Times. You may opt-out at any time. You agree to receive occasional updates and special offers for The New York Times's products and services. Thank you for subscribing. An error has occurred. Please try again later. You are already subscribed to this email. January 12, An article on Jan. News World U. 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You're maybe beholden to your Kickstarter backers as a classbut you aren't scared to talk to any individual one of them article source thought of what they might ask of you.

More to the point, you can never get out of the debt you incur, no matter what you do for the rest of your life. It's not just about the debt one incurs, it's about the one providing the debt and what they expect, lifelong admiration, respect, and deference.

I've had insane requests and expectations demanded by family members for really small "gifts" before. Because of that I'd say that the social interest costs are too high for many Americans to be able to accept anything. Izkata 7 months ago. Maybe not that extreme, but yeah, it's too easy to get guilted into something because you've become socially indebted by something large.

It's not even about being able to Why do indians own gas stations out of it, like you mention afterwards with a legal exchange, it's about the exchange being forced to continue Why do indians own gas stations of a mixture of guilt, politeness, and social pressure in general, simply because you don't want to accidentally kill the personal relationship.

It's not just practicing individualism, but insisting on it. People don't help others partly because they tell themselves that the person needs to make their own way. It is ultimately a justification for selfishness, but the justification is individualism.

And I suspect many people who would otherwise not be too proud to ask for help still won't because they perceive that this is a prominent idea in American culture. I think that here back to the same point. If I asked my rich uncle for a loan, he and many other people would perceive this as dependency and therefore vaguely shameful. If I took out a bank loan, even though it's technically the same action, those same people would perceive it as an admirable show of entrepreneurial initiative.

While I completely see your point about the negative side of individualism, I think this attitude is also partly based on a very culturally healthy distaste for nepotism.

When you ask your rich uncle for a Why do indians own gas stations, it's hard for both him and you to really know whether it's being given because he believes in Why do indians own gas stations, or because there is perceived to be an obligation. I'm not saying that relatives shouldn't help each other, but perhaps it's not such a bad thing that people seek out other avenues first in non-emergency situations.

It's a delicate balance to be sure. I think it's much deeper than Why do indians own gas stations streak in American culture".

Absolute fuck Watch Video Sexdate denbosch. Remember Me? Mark Forums Read. Page 1 of 2. Thread Tools. Jun Posts: Find More Posts by Tarik One. Sep Posts: Ask PleezeBelieve and the chick on his avatar. Find More Posts by Killuminati Originally Posted by Tarik One I mean everywhere. Feb Posts: Find More Posts by Knuck the Ficks. Apr Location: I walk the earth Kung Fu style Posts: Join Date: Jul Location: You could make the argument that startup founders who aren't taking a salary from their early stage startup are also performing "free, illegally so" labor. I think in that case, you can't work for yourself illegally. HeyLaughingBoy 7 months ago. If the startup is incorporated, then you're working for the corporation, not for "yourself. The original blockchain: There's an interesting ancient pattern of small minority groups dominating certain businesses, often ones which need trust -- here "handshake loans", but traditionally also simply payment for goods shipped long-distances. The Greek trader in one little Egyptian town could be more confident in dealing with another Greek trader somewhere in Italy, a week's sail away, because while he might be tempted to run off with the money, word would get around, and soon no other Greek would trust the guy, nobody would marry his sons This mechanism didn't work for people from the majority community, because they weren't so specialised, could do other business, could find another priest Thus the Greeks could ship things cheaper, and won the business. The Patels, and related Gujarati groups, have been in this kind of trust-heavy long-distance trade for centuries. They spread all over East Africa in the 19th C, and did very well. It's sort of common knowledge in India that Gujaratis, Sindhis, Punjabis and Malayalis Keralites are generally pretty enterprising and are often businessmen, both within India and abroad. There can be other such Indian communities too, of course. These are just the ones I have heard of from childhood as tending to be more so. Again, I don't mean to rule out other places where these or other Indians could have gone, these are just the ones I am more familiar with, and may have relatively high concentrations. Be interesting to know if there are other places where particular groups have gone and done well. Of course, lots of Indians went to Fiji and Malaysia too, I've read, although those may have mostly gone as plantation labor initially and some to Trinidad and Tobago, Guyana, etc. Don't know how those are doing now. I guess it is both because they use some different local Malaysian ingredients, and because of the long time of separation from India must have made their cuisine evolved to be somewhat different. It was interesting stuff, though. Yes indeed, they specialise within India too. And surely some of the same network benefits may apply there too. Surely Parsi entrepreneurs a century ago got better loans It's also my hazy impression that the plantation-labor Indian groups haven't done nearly as well on the whole. Another example is the surprisingly high proportion of overseas Chinese who are from Fujian. Could be. I do know that Parsis are said to take care of the elderly and poor of their community. They have retirement homes and do charity for them, etc. They are generally philantropic too, like some others. Good of them. I recently learned about oulipo https: Lack of resources can be sometimes a blessing in disguise whether it is literature or hard business. I wonder why Americans don't do this maybe they do, I don't know - why borrow from banks or VCs etc with strict strings attached, instead of supporting one another based on trust? There has been a long term decline of community banks, which might be the more American equivalent of this kind of lending. The Small Business Administration also helps with loan guarantees. So the support is sort of there, but takes a different form, and maybe one could say the impersonal nature of it is both a strength and a weakness in comparison. Numbers of small businesses and their starts have been in decline too. I suspect this has to do with the difficulty of more and more Americans in attaining any savings from their wages let alone enough to set aside to help capitalize a small business. I suspect this has to do with the difficulty of more and more Americans in attaining any savings from their wages All the more important to support one another. Although, if everyone in a person's trust circle is more or less in the same boat, then tough luck: Some non profits are working in this space too. After Sandy, some orgs in NY were giving interest free loans to small biz people who lost their trucks etc. Americans are forced by law and convention into living a very specific kind of life. Lots of things they do and "own" require substantial investment of money and time. A regular not minimum wage is calibrated to just barely take care of all that, and modern marketing specializes in "educating" our tastes so that we can really tell the difference between e. Although on average they are poorer, residents of India have a great deal more freedom with respect to the costs of everyday life. No matter how basic their housing, transport, clothing, food, education, safety, etc. Many lives lived happily in India would be largely illegal in USA. I think it's counter-intuitive but in a high trust society you don't have a need to build these networks. In a low-trust society like India you have to build trust networks. When you take these trust networks over to a high-trust society, they just act as additional leverage in your life. I know Indian guys who lent each other large five figure sums to help business deals go along and, the most surprising to me, had one take on a mortgage for another in Menlo Park! The family it was for was a dual income software engineer family, just missing a credit history and starting capital. Because there is a general lack of trust of people outside one's immediate family and a usually very small circle of friends. Family members are pretty much exempt from labor laws. Hence the cost structure can be a lot lower by using family labor. Most restaurants in Europe are run by immigrant families, they couldn't turn a profit otherwise. Could this apply, or have applied, to farms? I bet that would have a lot of interesting social effects. In my area it already does. I thought that was wonderful--I'm a fan of frugality. I'm curious if this is common in the US in other immigrant communities. My dad's friend is an Indian farmer in Valdosta, GA. He has 10k acres of land, has his own private plane and flies Indian groceries to Houston once a week. He immigrated to the US back in the 60's. I had a chance to meet him and he had an extraordinary character. He had no formalities and greeted us at his farm house without a shirt on. He was old but fit and you can tell what he has gone through in his life to make a living. He spoke fluent spanish and everyone loved him in Valdosta. We spent 3 days there and went to restaurants in the evening. Everyone greeted him as if he was some kind of a hero in the town. It was really an amazing experience to have met him and his family - just shows how immigrants assimilate in the most remote places in the US, especially in a hostile place such as south Georgia in the 60's. This story is from Wow, cool story. I wonder under what visa or work permit scheme he went there. I had two uncles and an aunt who went to the US and stayed there, but they all went via the traditional grad student then H1-B then green card then citizen route, and were all white collar workers an engineer turned entrepreneur and two academics , not farmers. Didn't know there were schemes for farmers and such, then or now, for the US, although I think there might be for Canada. At least in the late 70's - early 80's, if you could find an employer to "sponsor" you basically agree to give you a job for a certain amount of time , then you could immigrate with a green card immediately. There was no specific "scheme" for particular occupations: I'd assume something similar was already in place during the 60's. Interesting, thanks. Yes absolutely. As an Indian American, I'm familiar with the Indian grocery store model. However, I grew up in a majority vietnamese area of Southern California, and most of my friends growing up were vietnamese. They had a few interesting hustles going on: A few families were involved in growing produce in their backyards, and grocery stores would source these fruits. Many of the fruits certainly not all popular in Vietnam would grow in the heat of SoCal, but they were not farmed commercially. My mom's friend told her that many vietnamese restaurants sourced their egg rolls from various aunties scattered around the community. The egg roll they made was very standardized, and they would sell many trays a day to the restaurants for cents on the dollar. Under the table? I think it would be very difficult to bring Vietnamese flora into the USA through legitimate channels. The fruit I was talking about is dragon fruit: Hotels work because they require capital and low overhead — they also have a limited scope of competition. Small farmers are being starved out and losing access to capital as small banks go away. The big players in the agriculture business are global now, and a farmer in Ohio or New York will have a hard time making money, as the big companies just need to outbid you for one harvest season, and make up the difference with their weekly harvests in California, Chile, etc. There are players people serving Chinese restaurants and the Amish doing well, but those markets are limited. The model doesn't work in commodity ag, but no model really works for that in the long term. It always takes more capital. Farms have been failing or "consolidating", if you prefer for years. The bogeyman didn't shutter those banks. The nonviability of buying a bigger combine and renting more land every couple of years shuttered those banks. Such a bank could have stayed open if at least once every few years its county was the only one in the Great Plains to get rain. That would have been a lucky bank I'm not sure what will disrupt commodity ag, but it sucks, and the sooner it transforms into something else the better. The most successful farmers I know now are raising goats for halal butchers. I'm going to start crossing my cattle with "wagyu" bulls. Don't sell commodities. Could you elaborate on your question? It is the exact same with convenience stores. Work hour days. Only have other family members work there. CodeCube 7 months ago. If you are interested in these kinds of stories, check out the documentary http: Just recommended this film today to someone! Definitely worth checking out, even outside your interest of what General Tso actually is. I find this interesting, because my family used to take road trips all the time annually in the '90s, less often since then , and we mostly stayed in motels that were part of national chains like Hampton Inn, La Quinta, Holiday Inn Express, Fairfield by Marriott, Best Western, etc. I guess the owners could have been, but that would mean they're hiring people outside of family. I'm wondering if this article applies to just independent motels or if it also includes franchises of the national chains at least, I assume the national chains use a franchise model. I'd be honestly surprised if independent motels were a full half of the number of motels in the US, since the chains are everywhere. DhirubhaiPatel 7 months ago. The anti-asian immigration laws were repealed only in [1] only to benefit Poles and Italians but then also ended up benefiting Indians and Chinese. Many of them came to USA during that time and toiled mostly in menial jobs. It was only around late 80s that they had gathered enough influence to buy motels and such and this motel takeover was much more visible during early s. In the Obama era recession the property prices dropped further and many Indians purchased even more motels. Also the Patel community is not really into high end motels like Hampton Inn. They are into Motel 6, Super 8, Choice Hotels, etc. In fact, most of the franchise owner's staff is non-Indian. Also, most of the money you can make is by not hiring outside help. On the same note, I recently watched this video covering how Cambodian immigrants ended up running so many donuts shops, especially here in SoCal: And Tippi Hedren bringing Vietnamese refugees into the nail salon business. I became aware of the Gujarati hospitality empire some decades ago, when my work involved community organizing in the rural US. I was finding that just about all the old motels on state highways were run by Gujaratis. And when I'd become a regular, some would share about their experience. And would invite my friends and me for dinner, which was heaven. Especially given that the alternatives were typically burgers, steaks or fried chicken. This book provides the investment philosophy behind the Patel success and how it can apply in other realms. The Dhandho Investor: I look forward to the next National Geographic article in this series where they document in detail how American Jews came to run a substantial proportion of U. I need to put this more judiciously: I am from gujarat, do not own any motel. In my experience I can definitely believe this to be true. Personally know so many people heho owns motels. No one who travels and stays in small-to-medium-sized hotels is shocked by this. I have a complaint, however. We have so many Indian-Americans distributed all over the nation, and it is still fairly difficult to find good Indian food outside big cities. I've wondered about this, but what I've heard is that few Indian families eat out very often. Indian food is labor intensive and uses expensive ingredients. Restaurants are also low margin businesses that don't scale well and are super risky, not something I'd advise someone to do unless they have a passion for it and ability to fail and carry on with life. I have not been to a single Indian restaurant that can compare to a home cooked Gujarati meal, especially made by someone who grew up there. I'd be thrilled if there were some restaurants that passed a much lower bar than that. I don't agree about expensive ingredients. Lots of restaurants not all! The labor costs are an issue. I cooked a curry with garden vegetables and Gulf shrimp over the weekend, and it took over an hour perhaps it would have been unpalatable to a real Indian person, but three hillbillies from the Ozarks liked it just fine. However, it's possible to purchase e. But yeah restaurants are difficult. Way too much competition in that space unless you really like running a restaurant. Chinese-Americans seem to have had some success, however. For home cooking, pressure cooking makes Indian meals much easier. In a restaurant you'd presumably make big batches. Pressure cookers make lots of stuff easier! They don't chop up vegetables though Maybe saffron, but it's used very sparingly in only a few dishes, and a little goes a long way. Generally, vegetables are more expensive than grains and more perishable. By mass, Indian food is mostly grains and pulses Rice, wheat, and split peas. You should try Rajdhani in Artesia, CA if you get a chance. But that's the only one I have found. Or Shahnawaz, not too far away. For the time I spent in India, most of them eat their meals at street stalls throughout the day. Those that do have home cooked meals, often have housemaids that do all of that super labor intensive cooking. Even the relatively poor, have even poorer people working below them at home! Good Indian food doesn't exist in the US. This is incredibly diminutive of Indian cuisine in America. I'm sorry Michelin star means squat for Indian food. I have tried both and they are pretty crappy. Ah yes, Indian cuisine like "Bombay Sliders. Dude I've lived in Singapore. You don't have to tell me about food. Hopefully you made it to Penang then. While I am in agreement that BC has plenty of authentic south asian cuisine, Seattle is not so terrible. Food recommendation: The cuisine is way older than the partition What is good in Seattle? Everything good is actually within a km radius of Microsoft HQ in Redmond, on the east side. There's a really good chaat place. Mayuri the grocery store does have a great selection of staples items. Naan and Curry has the best non-vegetarian South-Asian food in the Seattle area. It has branches in Renton and Issaquah. I have personally found it much better than Maza grill, mentioned in the other comment. I got 2 greeting cards from the franchise in 1 year. Many of them lack higher education, trade skills, and have little knowledge of English. They are generally poor when they arrive. And unlike the Koreans and the Indians, their struggle for survival has had an impact on only a very specialized part of the city's economy. In the last decade, with more than stores, the Afghans have become specialists in the fast-food chicken business. To circumvent language and discrimination barriers, even their carpenters and chicken suppliers they use are Afghans. Their niche in the business originated in , when Abdul Karim Halemi, a student from Kandahar in Southern Afghanistan, got his first job was in the kitchen at Kansas Fried Chicken. A year later, he opened the first Kennedy's Fried Chicken. Now there are 40 unfranchised restaurants with that name -- all owned by Afghans, Mr. Halemi said. Halemi said he and other established Afghan immigrants in New York lead the new arrivals by the hand through the chicken fast-food business. The tough part is teaching them the intricacies of running a business in New York City. Halemi, who still works at his restaurant on Rockaway Boulevard in Queens behind the protection of bulletproof glass. When the new ones come to the store, they sit. They watch. They learn and then they work. An article on Jan. As Mr. Because of an editing error, a picture caption with the article misstated the number of gas stations Mr. Singh now owns. It is two. Please upgrade your browser. See next articles. View page in TimesMachine. Toil and Innovation One of the the most visible successes has been the Koreans. Newsletter Sign Up Continue reading the main story Please verify you're not a robot by clicking the box. Invalid email address. Please re-enter. You must select a newsletter to subscribe to. Sign Up. You will receive emails containing news content , updates and promotions from The New York Times. You may opt-out at any time. Those business people and golfers you're talking about grew up in wealthy families - and because of history white people are still wealthier than black people in the US but in various countries in Africa and the Middle East, black people run all the businesses and play golf and cricket. And I come from Australia - with a population the size of a city in China, the US, or Russia, we always manage to pull a solid 4th place in the Olympics So we do good at sports not because we're black, white, Asian or other, but because we're Australian!!! More to do with culture, history and statistics, than anything to do with race. Just get out of here, dude. You make me want to talk about plotting to destroy the white house like you were talking to everybody about earlier, trying to recruit people just so the government catches you. Google it or Yahoo it. Winning Sport Picks http: People get influenced by their surroundings and their friends, thats why And success depends on involvement, and involvement is easy when you are part of that group. Pagination 1. Existing questions. Why do Blacks majority play the victim?!?!? More questions. Why blacks are so underachievers in the majority of sports? Excluding few running events and basketball? Culturally speaking: Answer Questions Does your family despise for you to have an income? Do you think Brazil is a good place? Why does my parents keep encouraging me to go on welfare? Is my ex husbands new girlfriend pretty? What are the main reasons why human life expectancy more than doubled in past years? Why are Americans so stressed and obsessed with finishing everything in life at age 30? What does it say about you that you had to rent a leaf blower from Home Depot to clean the bathroom?.

Western Europe in the last years or so has been a very unusual place Because crudely speaking the catholic church wished to diminish alternative power structures, such as clans. This led to an unusually open society, which had Why do indians own gas stations benefits Kevin richardson backstreet boy.

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